Tag: abuse

19 Oct

A New Way to Prevent Elder Abuse

Noah Weisberg Elder Law, General Interest, In the News, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Elder financial abuse is a growing concern.  What is being done in Ontario to prevent it?

I recently came across a new service called Estate Protect which acts as a registry and fraud monitoring service for important estate documents, including powers of attorney.

Lawyers (on behalf of their clients) are able to register estate planning documents with Estate Protect being a secure and accessible place.  The idea is that the most recent documents, and a record of any changes, are available to the appropriate person when necessary to ensure that valid estate planning documents are used (and relied upon).

Using a power of attorney document as an example, through Estate Protect’s notification service, designated parties are made aware when someone tries to rely on a power of attorney document.  If the document is the valid power of attorney, the notified individual need not take any steps.  However, should the power of attorney be, for example, a fake or previously revoked power of attorney, or should the transaction seem suspicious, the notified individual has the opportunity to intervene to avoid misuse.

The service also allows people accepting instructions, such as banks, to determine whether the power of attorney is valid before acting on instructions.

It makes sense that Estate Protect relies on tackling financial elder abuse through preventative measures, as opposed to remedial options.

Noah Weisberg

Find this blog interesting?  Please consider these other related blogs:

29 Jun

New Report on Elder Abuse

Hull & Hull LLP Elder Law, Elder Law Insurance Issues, Health / Medical, Hull on Estates, In the News, Power of Attorney, Uncategorized Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Elderly persons are unquestionably at greater risk of abuse than the general public.  The five general categories of abuse are physical, sexual, psychological or emotional, financial, and neglect.  No doubt such abuse is on the rise, and is an issue that is generating attention worldwide.

The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) was reported to have taken a substantial step forward through its recent release of a lengthy report addressing abuse of the elderly.

The report includes many recommendations for change, with a focus on the betterment of care provided to those living in care facilities, including improving (i) the reporting and monitoring of abuse, with the process overseen by an independent body, and (ii) quality of care and staffing.

The authors of the article linked to this blog cite that little is known in Australia about the overall number and severity of abuse, with sexual assault being the least acknowledged, detected and reported.  They applaud the ALRC for recommending a national study to explore how common elder abuse is.

Their chief critique of the report, however, is that although it addresses the legal aspects of elder abuse, the impact on health and well-being of the victims is ignored.  Moreover, absent is any comment on whether inappropriate health care is a form of abuse (e.g. using resuscitation against someone’s wishes).

The authors highlight the primary challenge to prevention, which is to equip the legal, healthcare and elder care sectors to better screen, identify and intervene.  As we face similar difficulties, I expect that the initiatives and recommendations made by the ALRC would be well-received in Canada as well.

Thanks for reading,
Natalia Angelini

Other blog posts that may be of interest:

02 Sep

Elder Abuse

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In an aging society, our elderly can easily fall prey to predators looking to exploit them. Elder abuse can take many different forms: physical, psychological or financial abuse, or simply neglect.

I read an article yesterday about Huguette Clark, the 104 year old heiress whose wealth is estimated at half a billion dollars. During her lifetime, Clark made generous gifts towards those who cared for her. For instance, it is reported that Clark gifted $10 million dollars to her social secretary. 

It is reported that Clark’s wealth is being managed by her lawyer and her accountant. 

A former paralegal who worked for Clark’s attorney, has now blown the whistle on what she alleges is improper behavior by Clark’s attorney and accountant. According to reports, it is alleged that they “drafted a will that would have left money to [one of them], trying repeatedly to persuade her to sign it — then joked about their client and cursed her behind her back when she would not sign the will.” It is also reported that her lawyer allegedly solicited from Clark $1.5 million dollars to build a security system for a community where his daughters and their families live. In addition he allegedly sold a Stradivarius violin for $6 million dollars and a Renoir painting for $23.5 million. 

A criminal investigation has now been launched by the Manhattan district attorney, who has the Elder Abuse Unit of the New York County District Attorney’s Office looking into the handling of Clark’s finances.

It bears repeating that the complaints at this stage are unproven allegations. Nonetheless, the mere thought that this could happen provides us with a dreadful reminder of what the elderly face in our society today.

 

Thank you for reading,

 

Rick Bickhram – Click here for more information on Rick Bickhram.

 

27 Feb

All The News…

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

There were several estate related web postings that came to my attention this week. 

The Elder Abuse Awareness component of the Federal Government’s New Horizons for Senior’s Program announced 16 new projects directed at the prevention of elder abuse.  Somewhat to my surprise (largely because I assumed it was an area under provincial jurisdiction), the Federal Government has significantly increased funding to this program. 

In Britain, a committee is being charged with the task of considering future changes aimed at preventing the reigning monarch from sealing wills.  Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II directed that the Last Wills of both Princess Margaret and the Queen Mother be sealed, a decision that has been criticized in many quarters.

And lastly, let’s not forget the Last Will of George Washington which was drafted by the late President himself with "no professional character being consulted", his Will being an endeavour that "occupied many of my leisure hours."  Clocking in at 23 pages, Washington’s Will also had an addendum detailing the location, description and value of his numerous properties (knowledge gleaned from his days as a land surveyor and speculator).

Have a great weekend!

David M. Smith

 

 

17 Apr

Power of Attorney Abuse on the Rise

Hull & Hull LLP Elder Law, Elder Law Insurance Issues, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

By all indications, the abuse of Powers of Attorney to misappropriate assets is on the rise. 

When a grantor gives powers to an attorney to manage the grantor’s property, it allows the attorney to assist the grantor in managing property, and in fact to take over management of property altogether if the grantor does not monitor the situation.  Often the very goal of the grantor is to allow someone else to completely take over management of one’s property due to age, potential incapacity or other reasons, so the grantor has no intention to monitor.

This is often a reasonable choice, and the law holds attorneys to a high standard to protect grantors.  However, the potential for abuse is immense.  Abuse can be willful or simply negligent, but in either case the damage can be devastating and irreversible.  In many cases attorneys who stray from their duties are never made to account, although they have that obligation.  Often they live with the grantor and have little or no oversight.  The legal fees in securing justice are generally high, and the chances of recovering on a judgment can be low.  In the result, legal proceedings might be impractical, however blatant abuse may be in a given case.

The best defence against this problem is awareness, so these varied results from a quick internet search are somewhat encouraging: a Florida law firm website; an excellent Vancouver Sun article; a synopsis of a TV news story; the New York Attorney General’s website; a news report of a Philadelphia trial; and a news release from Prince Edward Island’s provincial government commenting on the problem for World Elder Abuse Day.

This is the tip of a very large iceberg: by all indications lawyers, financial institutions, governments and of course the public will be wrestling with a growing problem for years to come.  

Thanks for reading.

Sean Graham

20 Nov

The STEP and Elder Law Conferences – Hull on Estates Episode #86

Hull & Hull LLP Elder Law, Hull on Estates, Hull on Estates, Litigation, Podcasts Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to the STEP and Elder Law Conferences

This week on Hull and Estates, Ian Hull and Suzana Popovic-Montag discuss issues in Elder Law and their attendance at the STEP and Elder Law Conferences in Vancouver.

READ MORE

12 Jul

BREACH OF FIDUCIARY DUTY BY THE WILL MAKER – EXECUTOR AND TRUSTEE’S ROLE – WHAT TO DO ABOUT ABUSE CLAIMS? – PART III

Suzana Popovic-Montag Archived BLOG POSTS - Hull on Estates, Ethical Issues Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

As is sometimes the case, an unequal distribution of an estate as between children can arise from a testator who has had a long history of mental illness, chronic alcoholism or other such personal reasons, which may affect the testator’s state of mind over a period of many years.

For example, if a child who has been treated unequally grew up in a home where he or she suffered through instances of physical violence, as between the parents and him or herself, this may be the type of fact situation to consider when looking to pursue a claim for breach of fiduciary duty of parental obligations. Similarly, if the unequally treated child lived in a home that was constantly in turmoil, as a result of a chronically alcoholic parent, this situation should also be considered in the context of the fiduciary obligations of a parent.

In our view, one must find several compelling supporting facts to bolster any claim of breach of fiduciary duty or breach of parental obligation. Such facts should also be combined with a clear and identifiable estrangement as between parent and child.

Parental Obligations

In the decision of M. (K.) v. M. (H), the Supreme Court of Canada considered the whole concept of what is meant by the term "parental obligation".

The Court considered this issue in the context of a particularly gruesome and egregious set of facts.

In M.(K.) v. M.(H.), the Supreme Court of Canada examined the parent-child relationship in the circumstances of long-standing allegations of incest and abuse by a parent to a child.

READ MORE

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
 

CONNECT WITH US

CATEGORIES

ARCHIVES

TWITTER WIDGET