Category: RRSPs/Insurance Policies

23 Oct

Accidental Death Insurance: Determining Cause of Death

Paul Emile Trudelle RRSPs/Insurance Policies Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Accidental death policies are not to be confused with life insurance policies. By their terms, accidental death policies usually provide that the benefit will be paid out when death results from accidental, external means.

In determining whether a policy is payable, an issue often arises as to the exact cause of death and contributing factors. Further, exclusions in the policy often serve to allow the insurer to avoid payment.

Take, for example, the recent case of Downey v. Scotia Life Insurance Company, 2020 ABQB 638 CanLII). There, the insured died on a fishing trip. No autopsy was performed. The Coroner’s Report noted that the insured died by asphyxia due to drowning, and that the death was “accidental”.  Other “significant conditions contributing to death” was “myocardial infarction”, with the explanation being that the insured “had a myocardial infarction and fell out of the boat.”

The court struggled with whether the terms of the policy covered the death. The court ultimately found that the death was “accidental” in that the medical condition did not cause the death. However, exclusionary provisions in the policy applied so as to exclude coverage. The exclusion clause provided that a death was NOT covered if the death was “in any manner or degree associated with or occasioned by” or “contributed to in any way whatsoever” by any naturally occurring condition, illness, disease or bodily or mental infirmity. Although broad, the exclusion clause was not so broad so as to be void. (Exclusion clauses may be voided if they are so broad so as to “nullify the coverage provided in the policy, and would be contrary to the reasonable expectations of an ordinary person.)

The court referred to numerous “accidental death” cases and the outcomes are sometimes difficult to reconcile. For example, coverage was found in the following cases:

  • Insured fell from horse, developed pneumonia. Coverage applied. Death was due to fall. Pneumonia was a “sequela” of the accident;
  • Insured suffered a seizure causing him to fall and lodge his head in a position causing asphyxiation;
  • Insured suffering brain aneurysm causing fall into bathtub and drowning; and
  • Insured suffering seizure while driving causing fatal collision.

Coverage was not found in the following examples:

  • Insured suffering injury in car accident. Pre-existing condition of hemophilia was “mixed up in” the cause of death;
  • Insured fell, died of heart attack caused by the fall; and
  • Insured admitted to hospital for congestive heart problems, suffered fall at hospital requiring surgery, died from complications arising from surgery including congestive heart failure.

Accidental death claims can be complicated and raise difficult issues of factual determination: determining and framing the cause of death, and also issues of contractual interpretation: determining what is covered by the policy and what exclusions may apply.

Thanks for reading.

Paul Trudelle

19 Oct

So I have a life insurance policy, can I sell that policy to someone else? 

Doreen So RRSPs/Insurance Policies Tags: , , , 0 Comments

The answer is no in Ontario.  Currently, only a limited number of Canadian provinces (Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Saskatchewan) will allow a policy holder to sell his/her insurance policy to a third party.

Life insurance policies are commonplace in Canada.  A life insurance policy is a contract with the insurance company and it is a contract to pay out a sum of money upon the death of the life insured.  While most people may be content to maintain their life insurance policy, as is, until their death, those who are in need of cash during their lives may wish to sell the policy for a present-day payout while the purchaser maintains the premiums (and any other obligations to the insurance company) in exchange for the payout on the death.  The sale of a life insurance policy by the policy holder is also known in the industry as a “life settlement”.

According to Tyler Wade’s article on ratehub.ca, the practice of selling one’s own insurance policy was popularized in the U.S. when investors saw the AIDS epidemic in the 1908’s as an opportunity where they could offer those suffering from AIDS a payout during their lifetime in exchange for the death benefit in their policies believing, then, that this group of individuals had a shorter life span.  The vulnerability of the individuals within this market group and the potential for financial abuse are often cited as the reasons why life settlements ought to be prohibited for public policy reasons.

In Ontario, life settlements are prohibited under section 115 of the Insurance Act, as follows:

“Trafficking in life insurance policies prohibited

115 Any person, other than an insurer or its duly authorized agent, who advertises or holds himself, herself or itself out as a purchaser of life insurance policies or of benefits thereunder, or who trafficks or trades in life insurance policies for the purpose of procuring the sale, surrender, transfer, assignment, pledge or hypothecation thereof to himself, herself or itself or any other person, is guilty of an offence.”

In 2017 and 2018, there was an attempt to legalize life settlements by amending section 115 (through Bill 162) and by amending the Act to allow third-party lenders to use life insurance policies as collateral (through Bill 20).  Both Bills received opposition from non-profit groups like the Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association due to the potential for financial abuse and section 115 of the Act has remained as is in Ontario.

While it is difficult to comment on how the potential for financial abuse can be mitigated by implementing countermeasures, it is unfortunate that Ontarians have limited options once the policy is in place.

Thanks for reading!

Doreen So

28 Jul

Life Insurance During COVID-19

Nick Esterbauer Beneficiary Designations, Elder Law Insurance Issues, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Health / Medical, In the News, RRSPs/Insurance Policies Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Life insurance can be an important part of an estate plan, be it taken out to fund payment of anticipated tax liabilities triggered by death, to assist in supporting surviving family members, or to equalize the distribution of an estate within the context of the gift of an asset of significant value (such as a family business) to one child to the exclusion of another, who can be designated as beneficiary of the policy.

In a time when many Canadians are facing their mortality and taking the pause from normal life as an opportunity to review and update estate plans, many Canadians are turning their minds to other aspects of estate planning, including supplementing an estate plan with life insurance.  A recent Financial Post article suggests that life insurance applications have doubled during the pandemic, as more Canadians take steps to plan for the unexpected during this period of uncertainty.

At the same time, premiums for new permanent life insurance policies have increased by as much as 27%.  While term life insurance policies may remain a more affordable option, they too are anticipated to become more expensive, with upcoming premium increases of up to 20%.  The increase in premiums has been linked to lowering interest rates and restrictions to the investment options available to insurance companies.

Other changes to life insurance during the pandemic include the exclusion of the standard medical examination required in order to obtain some types of coverage.  The maximum coverage offered by many providers without a medical exam has increased to reflect limitations to the ability for applicants to safely attend an in-person examinations.  For other providers and types of plans, medical examinations are simply on hold.

Lastly, insurance companies have updated intake questionnaires to include COVID-screening questions.  If an applicant is experiencing potential symptoms, they may be required to wait two weeks before taking out the policy, but are not typically ineligible from coverage altogether.  Some insurers, however, are no longer offering new coverage to seniors or others who are at a higher risk of complications during the period of the pandemic.

One life insurance provider has already doubled its projected COVID-19-related payouts during 2020 from the figures it had released earlier this year.  While there may have been changes to certain eligibility requirements and the cost of life insurance, it remains a suitable estate planning tool for many Canadians.

Thank you for reading,

Nick Esterbauer

 

Other blog posts that you may enjoy reading:

20 Jul

When and how can your travel insurance be voided?

Doreen So General Interest, Health / Medical, RRSPs/Insurance Policies, Uncategorized Tags: , , , 0 Comments

The late Donald Farb called his insurance company to renew his travel insurance policy before his trip to Florida.  Mr. Farb spent about half an hour with a telephone representative from Manulife to complete the insurance application.  He said “no” to a variety of questions regarding his medications and pre-existing conditions.  Thereafter, the travel policy was issued on the basis of the information provided by Mr. Farb, and Mr. Farb went on his trip.  While he was in Florida, Mr. Farb was unexpectedly hospitalized and he incurred over $130,000 (USD) in hospital expenses.  Manulife later denied Mr. Farb’s claim for reimbursement and took the position that his policy was voided on the grounds of misrepresentation.  Mr. Farb died before his insurance claim was resolved and his Estate commenced a court application to continue Mr. Farb’s dispute with Manulife.

In considering the Estate’s application, Justice Belobaba of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice reviewed the first principles of the Insurance Act and how the Act is designed to protect both the insurer and the insured.  While insurance companies are protected by the insured’s duty to disclose, and the right to void coverage if there was a failure to disclose or misrepresentation, the consumer is protected by the requirement that the application process be done in writing so that the consumer will have the opportunity to review the information provided and to make any necessary corrections before the policy takes effect.

Justice Belobaba found that Manulife’s application process satisfied the requirements under the Insurance Act.  He found that there was no issue with the telephone service provided by Manulife and the way that information is collected verbally from the applicant because the completed application form is emailed, in writing, back to the applicant for verification.  The emailed and mailed copy of the insurance policy also contained a multitude of warnings asking the insured to review their policy carefully before traveling and that “the policy is void in the case of fraud, attempted fraud, or if you conceal or misrepresent any material fact in your application”.

As evidence before the Court, Justice Belobaba was provided with an audio recording of Mr. Farb’s telephone call with the insurance representative, and a copy of the materials that were emailed and mailed to Mr. Farb.  Justice Belobaba found that Mr. Farb had two months to review his answers to the medical questions that were asked of him, and there was no evidence that Mr. Farb ever contacted Manulife to correct his answers, which was sufficient to conclude that Manulife was within its rights to void the policy.

The Estate’s application was dismissed, and you can read the full reasons for decision in Estate of Donald Farb v. Manulife, 2020 ONSC 3037, by clicking here.

Travel insurance should always be top of mind before travelling.  It is a good idea to reach out to your insurance company and review your existing policy and the information contained in the underlying application before you go, especially under the present circumstances with COVID-19.  The issue of whether testing and medical care for COVID-19 will be covered while abroad is important to consider before any travel plans are finalized.

Thanks for reading,

Doreen So

17 Oct

A Rose between Thorns: The Interpleader Motion

Garrett Horrocks Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, General Interest, Litigation, RRSPs/Insurance Policies Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Occasionally in litigation, an innocent party will get caught in the crossfire between two litigants that have made competing claims to property held by the innocent party.  The classic case is that of an insurance company in possession of the proceeds of an insurance policy, the benefit of which is claimed by two parties.

The insurer may not necessarily be a party to the litigation between the two claimants, but they are nonetheless implicated given that they hold the coveted payout.  What is the insurer to do?  Enter the interpleader motion.

The interpleader motion is a powerful yet rarely utilized tool that can be used by an innocent party to essentially extricate itself from a proceeding in which competing claims have been made against property held by that party.  Rule 43.02 of the Rules of Civil Procedure provide that a party may seek an interpleader order in respect of personal property if,

(a) two or more other persons have made adverse claims in respect of the property; and

(b) the first-named person (being the “innocent” party),

(i) claims no beneficial interest in the property, other than a lien for costs, fees, or expenses; and

(ii) is willing to deposit the property with the court or dispose of it as the court directs.

In other words, the interpleader motion permits a party to seek an order from the court allowing that party to deposit, with the Accountant of the Superior Court of Justice, the property against which the adverse claims are being made.  However, that party must not have any beneficial interest in the property being deposited, although they are entitled to have any legal fees in bringing the motion, and other reasonable expenses, paid out of that property.

Some cases have opined on whether the court hearing the interpleader motion has an obligation to assess the likelihood of success of one or  both of the claims to the property at issue.  In Porter v Scotia Life Insurance Co, for example, the court considered whether, notwithstanding that one of the competing claims was “without strong foundation and built upon hearsay and suspicion”, it nonetheless held that the claim was “not frivolous” and granted the interpleader order.

Thanks for reading.

Garrett Horrocks

10 Dec

Are remedial constructive trusts available on the basis of “good conscience”?

Nick Esterbauer Estate & Trust, Litigation, RRSPs/Insurance Policies Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The Supreme Court of Canada’s recent decision in Moore v Sweet provided meaningful clarification on the Canadian law of unjust enrichment and, in particular, the juristic reason analysis.

As it made a finding of unjust enrichment, it was not necessary for the Court to consider the second issue before it, being whether, in the absence of unjust enrichment, a constructive trust could nevertheless be imposed in the circumstances on the basis of “good conscience”.

In 1997, the Supreme Court released its decision in Soulos v Korkontzilas.  That case considered situations that may give rise to a constructive trust remedy.  In referring to the categories in which a constructive trust may be appropriate, which were noted to historically include where it was otherwise required by good conscience, Justice McLachlin (as she then was) stated as follows:

I conclude that in Canada, under the broad umbrella of good conscience,  constructive trusts are recognized both for wrongful acts like fraud and breach of duty of loyalty, as well as to remedy unjust enrichment and corresponding deprivation…Within these two broad categories, there is room for the law of constructive trust to develop and for greater precision to be attained, as time and experience may dictate.

Since 1997, Soulos and the above excerpt have been interpreted inconsistently by scholars and courts of appeal throughout Canada.  Some consider Soulos to restrict the availability of constructive trust remedies to only situations where there has been a finding of unjust enrichment or wrongful conduct, while others favour a more liberal interpretation.

The appellant in Moore v Sweet sought, in the alternative to a remedy on the basis of unjust enrichment, a remedial constructive trust with respect to the proceeds of the life insurance policy on the basis of good conscience.  In choosing not to address this issue, Justice Côté (writing for the Majority) stated as follows:

This disposition of the appeal renders it unnecessary to determine whether this Court’s decision in Soulos should be interpreted as precluding the availability of a remedial constructive trust beyond cases involving unjust enrichment or wrongful acts like breach of fiduciary duty. Similarly, the extent to which this Court’s decision in Soulos may have incorporated the “traditional English institutional trusts” into the remedial constructive trust framework is beyond the scope of this appeal. While recognizing that these remain open questions, I am of the view that they are best left for another day.

It will be interesting to see if and when the Supreme Court ultimately chooses to determine “the open questions” regarding the availability of the remedial constructive trust.  Until then, it appears that some debate regarding the circumstances in which it may be imposed will remain.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

01 Jun

If You Plead It, You Have to Lead It

Paul Emile Trudelle Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, RRSPs/Insurance Policies, Trustees, Uncategorized, Wills 0 Comments

If a party refers to a document in a pleading, the party de facto waives any privilege attaching to the document, and the document has to be produced.

That is the lesson that we are reminded of in Master Short’s decision in TTC Insurance v. MVD Law, 2018 ONSC 2611 (CanLII).

There, TTC Insurance, the insurer for the TTC, alleged that the defendant engaged in an unlawful scheme to defraud the TTC by intentionally submitting forged invoices. In the Statement of Claim, the plaintiff referred to an audit and investigation that was carried out by the plaintiff. The defendant sought production of the details and results of the audit and investigation. TTC Insurance resisted, claiming privilege.

Master Short ordered the plaintiff provide the contents and results of the audit and investigation giving rise to the claim.

Master Short cited case law to the effect that a waiver of privilege does not occur simply because a party refers to the receipt of legal advice, or where a party states that they relied on legal advice. However, it is waived where the party uses the legal advice as a substantive element of the claim. “It is waived when the client relies on the receipt of advice to justify conduct in respect to an issue at trial.”

It should also be noted that once solicitor-client privilege is waived, the waiver applies to the entire subject-matter of the communications.

Master Short’s succinct conclusion was that a party is entitled to have produced for his inspection any document referred to in a pleading or affidavit delivered by another party whether or not that document would otherwise be privileged. Master Short  also relied on Rule 30.04(2) which provides that a request to inspect documents may be used to obtain the inspection of any document in another party’s possession, control or power that is referred to in the originating process, pleadings or an affidavit served by the other party.

Thus, be careful of what you plead: if you plead a document, you will have to produce it, privileged or not.

As Master Short set out in the preamble to his decision:

The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ,
Moves on: nor all they Piety nor Wit
Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line,
Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.

Omar Khayyam

Have a great weekend.

Paul Trudelle

10 Apr

The Policy of Setting Policy: Cotnam v Rousseau and Judicial Activism

Garrett Horrocks Beneficiary Designations, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Litigation, Pension Benefits, Public Policy, RRSPs/Insurance Policies, Support After Death Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

The practice of injecting policy considerations into court decisions has long been a tenet of the Ontario judiciary.  However, such considerations may arguably raise questions that go beyond the scope of the decision.  Cotnam v Rousseau, 2018 ONSC 216, is one such case.

In Cotnam, the Court was tasked with determining whether a pre-retirement death benefit received by a surviving spouse was available to be clawed back into an Estate pursuant to section 72 of the Succession Law Reform Act (the “SLRA”).  The Respondent took the position that section 48 of the Pension Benefits Act (the “PBA”) sheltered the death benefit from being clawed back given that she was the spouse of the Deceased.  The Court disagreed and held that such benefits ought to be available for claw back in order to prevent irrational outcomes resulting from their exclusion.

In the context of the facts at play in Cotnam, the Court reasoned in favour of equity, in particular, to ensure a dependant disabled child of the Deceased was properly provided for. However, the Court’s reasons appear to gloss over a fundamental conflict between the SLRA and the PBA, a clash about which the estates bar might have appreciated some judicial commentary.  Specifically, the Court held that the provisions of the SLRA ascribing pension death benefits as available to satisfy a claim of dependant’s relief ought to prevail over the PBA’s provisions sheltering them from claw back.

Section 114 of the PBA provides that, “[i]n the event of a conflict between this Act and any other Act […] [the PBA] prevails unless the other Act states that it is to prevail over [the PBA].”  The SLRA, in contrast, is silent as to whether its provisions are to prevail over those of the PBA.

However, the Court’s reasons make no mention of the interplay between section 114 of the PBA and the equities of ensuring the dependant daughter in Cotnam was properly provided for.  While we may opine on the fact that the outcome in Cotnam favours equity over rote statutory interpretation, the estates bar is left to grapple with the apparent inconsistency with the intention of the Ontario legislature, and whether it will affect similar decisions going forward.  As of this date, no written decisions have yet interpreted Cotnam, nor has the decision been appealed.  Accordingly, it may be some time before the impact of the decision, if any, is felt.

Thanks for reading.

Garrett Horrocks

If you enjoyed this blog, please consider these other related posts:

Dependant Support and Pre-Retirement Death Benefits

Rehel v Methot: Life Income Funds and Spousal Entitlements

01 Mar

Impact of Physician-Assisted Death on Estate and Insurance Planning

Nick Esterbauer Beneficiary Designations, Elder Law Insurance Issues, Estate Planning, Ethical Issues, Health / Medical, RRSPs/Insurance Policies Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

For many Canadians, one or more life insurance policies represent an important component of an estate plan.  If a policy cannot be honoured as a result of the cause of the insured’s death, this may completely frustrate his or her testamentary wishes.

The terms of life insurance policies typically address the issue of whether a beneficiary will be entitled to the insurance proceeds in the event that an individual commits suicide.  Policy terms typically include a restriction as to the payout of the policy if the insured dies by his or her own hands within a certain of number of years from the date on which the policy is taken out (most often two years).

With the decriminalization of physician-assisted death, there was initially some concern regarding whether medical assistance in dying would be distinguished from suicide for the purposes of life insurance.  The preamble to the related federal legislation, however, distinguishes between the act of suicide and obtaining medical assistance in dying.

As mentioned by Suzana Popovic-Montag in a recent blog entry, the Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association suggested in 2016 that, if a Canadian follows the legislated process for obtaining medial assistance in dying, life insurance providers will pay out on policies that are less than two years old.  Since then, the Medical Assistance in Dying Statute Law Amendment Act, 2017 has come into force to provide protection and clarity for Ontario patients and their families.  This legislation has resulted in amendments to various provincial legislation, including the Excellent Care for All Act, 2010, a new section of which now reads as follows:

…the fact that a person received medical assistance in dying may not be invoked as a reason to deny a right or refuse a benefit or any other sum which would otherwise be provided under a contract or statute…unless an express contrary intention appears in the statute.

The amendments provided for within the legislation introduced by the Ontario government represent an important step in the recognition of physician-assisted death as a right that is distinguishable from the act of suicide.  They also confirm the right of individuals who access medical assistance in dying to benefit their survivors with life insurance policies or other benefits.

Thank you for reading,

Nick Esterbauer

 

Other blog posts that may be of interest:

06 Feb

Rehel v Methot: Life Income Funds and Testamentary Beneficiary Designations

Umair Beneficiary Designations, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Executors and Trustees, Litigation, RRSPs/Insurance Policies, Trustees, Wills 0 Comments

In yesterday’s blog post, I discussed Justice Gomery’s recent decision in Rehel v Methot, 2017 ONSC 7529, where the Court was asked to resolve the question of the beneficial entitlement to the Deceased’s life income fund account (the “Account”).

The Deceased named his ex-spouse, Sharon, as the beneficiary when the Account was first opened. However, in his later Will, the Deceased directed the Estate Trustee of his Estate to use the proceeds of the Account to service his debts.

Having concluded that the Sharon was not automatically entitled to the Account by operation of provincial pension benefits legislation, the residual question was whether the direction under the Will overrode the prior beneficiary designation in Sharon’s favour.

Designations Under Part III of the Succession Law Reform Act

Subsection 51(1) of the Succession Law Reform Act (the “SLRA”) states that a participant (i.e. the person entitled to designate another person to receive a benefit payable under a plan on the participant’s death) may designate a person to receive a benefit payable under a “plan” (as defined under the Act) by an instrument signed by him or her or by Will. Subsection 51(1) also states that the person may also revoke the designation by either of these methods.

However, pursuant to subsection 51(2) of the SLRA, a designation in a Will is only effective if it relates “expressly to a plan, either generally or specifically.” Similarly, under subsection 52(1), a revocation in a Will is effective to revoke a designation made by instrument “only if the revocation relates expressly to the designation, either generally or specifically.”

Subsection 52(2) goes on to state that a later designation revokes an earlier designation, to the extent of any inconsistency.

The Parties’ Positions

In Rehet, Sharon argued that the instructions under the Will were not an effective revocation under subsection 52(1), as they do not mention the earlier designation in Sharon’s favour.

Conversely, the Estate Trustee argued that the designation does not have to meet the formal requirements of subsection 52(1), so long as it complies with subsections 51(2) and 52(2). In other words, a designation should prevail if it is a later designation that relates expressly to a plan.

Both parties relied on the Court of Appeal’s decision in Laczova Estate v Madonna House (2001), 207 DLR (4th) 341, where the testator made a holograph will where she listed two RSPs as her assets and then made bequests to twenty two beneficiaries. The estate trustee in Laczova similarly argued that the reference to the RSPs under the testator’s will was a designation under subsection 51(2) and revoked the earlier designation in accordance with subsection 52(2).

In Laczova, the Court of Appeal rejected the estate trustee’s argument because the testator had not designated a specific person or persons as beneficiaries of her RSPs under her later Will.

Justice Gomery’s Decision

Although the Court of Appeal’s decision in Laczova had favoured the prior designated beneficiaries, Justice Gomery held that the Court’s conclusions supported the Estate Trustee’s position in Rehel.

Justice Gomery noted that the Court of Appeal had not rejected the logic of the Estate Trustee’s argument regarding the operation of subsections 51(2) and 52(2), despite finding in favour of the prior designated beneficiaries.

In addition, Justice Gomery held that the Court of Appeal’s reasoning in Laczova suggested that the rationale for subsection 51(2) is to give estate trustees and financial institutions sufficient information to act on the directions in a Will.

In the present circumstances, the Court concluded that there was no ambiguity as to the Deceased’s intentions. The Court concluded that the Will revoked the earlier designation, and that the designation under the Deceased’s Will prevailed.

Thank you for reading,

Umair Abdul Qadir

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