Category: Litigation

24 Sep

Staying or consolidating proceedings: the tests and factors

Sydney Osmar Litigation Tags: 0 Comments

In the recent decision of Rabba v Rabba, 2019 ONSC 5205, the Honourable Justice Dietrich provides a helpful reminder and summary of the tests applied and the relevant factors considered by the court in determining whether or not a temporary stay or a consolidation of proceedings is appropriate.

Pursuant to rule 6.01(1) of the Rules of Civil Procedure, where two or more proceedings are pending in the court and it appears to the court that,

  1. they have a question of law or fact in common,
  2. the relief claimed in them arises out of the same transaction or occurrence or series of transactions or occurrences, or
  3. for any other reason an order ought to be made.

Additionally, the court may order that,

  1. the proceedings be consolidated, or heard at the same time or one immediately after the other, or
  2. any of the proceedings may be stayed until after the determination of any other of them, or asserted by way of counterclaim in any other of them.

In addition to the parameters provided for in rule 6.01, there are overriding policy considerations aimed at:

  • avoiding the multiplicity of proceedings,
  • promoting the expeditious and inexpensive determination of disputes, and
  • avoiding inconsistent judicial findings.

Justice Dietrich then went on to highlight the factors considered by the court in determining whether to matters should be heard together, or one immediately after the other, as set out in Marchant (Litigation Guardian of) v RBC Dominion Securities, 2013 ONSC 2042:

  • will the order sought create a savings in pretrial procedure?
  • will the number of trial days be reduced?
  • will a party be seriously inconvenienced by being required to attend a trial where they only have a marginal interest?
  • will costs of experts’ time and witness fees be reduced?
  • is one matter at a more advanced stage of litigation than the other?
  • will the order result in delay in one of the actions?
  • are any of the actions proceeding in a different fashion?

In considering whether a temporary stay is appropriate, Justice Dietrich outlined the principles set out in Hathro Management Property v Adler, 2018 ONSC 1560, including, among others:

  • differences in the substantive scope and remedial jurisdiction of the two courts;
  • the comparative progress of the two proceedings,
  • whether the proceedings will proceed sequentially or in tandem,
  • the ability of the defendant to respond to both matters, apart from just the financial burden or inconvenience of having to do so,
  • the possibility for inconsistent results, and
  • the potential for double recovery.

Thanks for reading!

Sydney Osmar

09 Sep

Litigation and third-party funding

Sydney Osmar Litigation Tags: 0 Comments

It is not uncommon for people to find themselves in situations where they are facing a long legal battle, while simultaneously lacking funds to see them through to the finish line. In some instances, people may even seek out assistance from third parties.

Third-party litigation funding is a relatively recent and growing phenomenon in Canada. Canadian jurisprudence has recognized that the third-party litigation funding model can have a positive effect on access to justice. However, the model has raised concerns regarding strangers, involving themselves in the litigation of others’, improperly “stirring up strife.”

Historically, the common law has curtailed these concerns through the doctrines of champerty and maintenance. In McIntyre Estate v Ontario, the Ontario Court of Appeal has defined “maintenance” as being directed against those who, for an improper motive, become involved with the disputes of others, in which the maintainer has no interest whatsoever. Champerty is an egregious form of maintenance which carries with it the added element that the maintainer shares in the profits of the litigation.

Champerty is no longer a crime, and its strictures have been substantially loosened over time, recognizing that a bona fide business arrangement that did not “stir up” litigation was not necessarily champertous. In other words, the courts have recognized that a commercial motive is not necessarily an improper motive (see Buday v. Locator of Missing Heirs Inc.).

In Houle v St. Jude Medical Inc. the court summarized the current state of the law of champerty. Some of the main points are highlighted below:

  • the elements of a claim of champerty are: (1) the defendant for an improper motive (officious intermeddling) provides assistance to a litigant in a lawsuit against the plaintiff; (2) the defendant has no personal interest in the lawsuit; (3) the defendant’s assistance to one of the litigants is without justification or excuse; and (4) the defendant shares in the spoils of the litigation;
  • the law has evolved such that supporting another’s litigation is not categorically illegal, and thus, contingency fees and third-party funding of litigation has become a possibility;
  • to approve a third-party funding agreement, the court must be satisfied that:
    • (a) the agreement is necessary in order to provide access to justice;
    • (b) the access to justice facilitated by the agreement must be substantively meaningful;
    • (c) the agreement must be fair and reasonable;
    • (d) the funder must not be overcompensated for assuming the risks of an adverse costs aware; and
    • (e) the agreement must not interfere with the lawyer-client relationship.

In McIntyre Estate, the court held that it is the motive of the third party funder that is among the most relevant factors in determining whether maintenance is made out – if the motive is genuine and arises out of concern for the litigant’s rights, it is not maintenance.

In Houle, the court recognized that while the law no longer automatically treats third-party litigation funding agreements as unlawful, it does not follow -– in the class action industry –  that a third-party funding agreement is necessary or appropriate in all cases. Instead, the court predicts that the common law in this area will continue to evolve incrementally, as each case comes forward.

Thanks for reading!

Sydney Osmar

04 Sep

Preparing for Estate Mediation

Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Estate Planning, Litigation, Mediators Tags: , , , 0 Comments

With the enactment of Rule 75.1 of the Rules of Civil Procedure, those involved in disputes relating to an estate, trust or substitute decision-making matter in Toronto, Ottawa or the County of Essex are referred to mediation unless there is a court order exempting it under Rule 75.1.04.

As lawyers, “mediation” is a term we are familiar with. However it may not be as familiar to clients. Many of them may have never heard of “mediation” before. As such, if you or a client have an upcoming mediation, it is important to prepare early to avoid being caught off guard during the mediation.

What is Mediation?

Mediation is a form of alternative dispute resolution where people can settle their disputes outside of court. It is a voluntary process in which the parties meet with a neutral third-party (referred to as the “mediator”) who provides them with assistance in negotiating a settlement. The mediator does not impose a judgment as the process is led by the parties.

Mediation vs. Litigation

The big “pull factor” to mediation is that it vastly differs from litigation. The major differences include:

  • Decision-Making: With mediation, the parties decide the outcome but with litigation, a judge imposes his or her decision upon the parties
  • Private vs. Public Process: Mediation is a private and confidential process, whereas litigation is a public process
  • Costs: The costs of mediation are typically lower than that of litigation
  • Time: The mediation process tends to be faster than litigation
  • Adversarial vs. Non-Adversarial: Mediation is viewed as a non-adversarial process, whereas litigation is viewed as an adversarial process

Preparation for Mediation

Preparation for mediation should start well in advance of the mediation date.

Preparing the Client

Start by explaining to the client what mediation is and how the process works. Assure the client that the mediator will be a neutral facilitator and that abusive behaviour by the other party will not be tolerated.

As part of discussing the mediation process with the client, let the client know about the time commitment that mediation entails. The mediation could last the entire day or even multiple days.

Determine the client’s interests and goals for the mediation. Are they looking to settle the case at mediation or are they prepared to go to trial? What types of offers would they be willing to accept?

Preparation for the Lawyer

Know the mediator’s background and approach beforehand. Is the mediator someone who has a background in estates law? Are they a lawyer? Are they a former judge? Knowing the answers to these questions can help the lawyer determine what approach would be the most beneficial to employ during mediation.

Prepare a comprehensive mediation brief and send it to the opposing counsel and mediator well in advance of the hearing date. A comprehensive mediation brief can maximize a lawyer’s presentation at the mediation. It is helpful to include copies of all relevant documents, such as the wills in question, within the brief. Additionally, it might be helpful to include a chronology of events as a schedule to the mediation brief.

If the mediation results in a settlement, ensure that the terms of the settlement are formally documented and that each client has signed the document. In some cases, however, a “cooling-off period” of one or two days from the proposed settlement might be necessary.

At the end of the day, the best approach a lawyer can take in preparing for mediation is to know the mediator, prepare their documents ahead of time and provide the client with as much information about the mediation process as possible. The more prepared the lawyer and the client are, the smoother the mediation will go.

For more information on preparing your client for an estate mediation, visit this link.

 

Thanks for reading,

Ian Hull & Celine Dookie

19 Aug

The Death of a Limited Partner

Doreen So Continuing Legal Education, Estate Planning, Executors and Trustees, General Interest, Litigation Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Earlier this year, the Ontario Court of Appeal considered the issue of an estate’s entitlement to the residual assets of a partnership upon the death of its sole limited partner.

Canadian Home Publishers Inc. v. Parker, 2019 ONCA 314, is a lawsuit between the general partner and the Estate Trustees of the deceased limited partner, David.  Canadian Home Publishers Inc. was incorporated when Lynda and David decided to purchase Canadian House and Home magazine in 1985.  Lynda and David were married at the time.  The corporation was owned by Lynda as the sole general partner and by David as the sole limited partner.  It was their intention that Lynda would run the company as her own business and David would make use of its tax losses.

The couple later divorced in 1991.  Litigation ensued and there was a previous decision about the nature of the parties’ oral partnership agreement in the ’90s.  David dies in 2012.  By the time of his death, David had received over $26 million from his interest as the limited partner.  The magazine itself was valued at over $50 million.  Lynda, as the general partner, sought a declaration that 1) the limited partnership was dissolved upon David’s death, and 2) that David’s Estate was only entitled to a share of the profits to the date of his death and a repayment of his remaining capital contribution (i.e. that the Estate was not entitled to share in the residual value of Canadian Home Publishers).

The lower court found that 1) the limited partnership was indeed dissolved upon David’s death and 2) that David’s Estate was entitled to an equal share of the residual value of Canadian Home Publishers with Lynda.  While the Court of Appeal upheld the finding that the limited partnership was dissolved on death, the second finding was overturned and the Estate was limited from any additional benefit over above its share in profits as of the date of death and a return of capital.

The Court’s analysis provides a helpful description of the differences between limited partnerships and ordinary partnerships.  A limited partner is meant to be a passive investor whose exposure to liability is limited to the extent of his or her capital contribution unless otherwise provided in the Limited Partnerships Act (see paras. 20-21).  A limited partner has no broader right to participate in the upside of the limited partnership, just as the limited partner has no broader obligation to suffer or contribute in the downside (para. 25).

Since we are talking about House & Home, here is a recipe from their website for pineapple honey ribs 🙂

Thanks for reading and until next time!

Doreen So

23 Jul

Putting Your Best Foot Forward: Evidence on Summary Judgment Motions

Garrett Horrocks Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Litigation, Public Policy Tags: , , 0 Comments

In Drummond v Cadillac Fairview, the Court of Appeal for Ontario considered the issue of the admissibility of hearsay evidence on a motion for summary judgment.  The facts in Drummond are quite simple.  The plaintiff tripped on a skateboard while shopping at the Fairview Mall in Toronto, owned by the defendant.  The plaintiff brought an action for occupier’s liability, supported by an affidavit sworn by him.  The defendant, Cadillac Fairview, responded by bringing a motion for summary judgment.

At the hearing of the motion, not only did the judge dismiss Cadillac Fairview’s motion for summary judgment, but it granted summary judgment in favour of the plaintiff (a remedy that the plaintiff was not seeking).  Cadillac Fairview appealed and was successful at the Court of Appeal.

In granting the appeal, the Court identified serious concerns regarding the hearsay evidence relied on by the plaintiff in responding to Cadillac Fairview’s summary judgment motion.  The plaintiff’s responding affidavit relied heavily on statements purportedly made by his fiancée and his daughter, and two unidentified staff members working at the mall.  The trial judge agreed that these statements were hearsay but admitted them nonetheless under the business records exception to the hearsay rule and under Rule 20.02 of the Rules of Civil Procedure.

The Court of Appeal rejected the admission of the hearsay statements.  While the Court agreed that Rule 20.02 permitted the admission of affidavit evidence “made on information and belief”, the Court also noted that the Rule permits a trier of fact to draw an adverse inference if a party with personal knowledge of contested facts does not give evidence.

The Court of Appeal found that the information relayed by the plaintiff from his fiancée and his daughter “went to the heart” of his claim.  The plaintiff’s failure to have his fiancée or daughter swear their own affidavits with respect to the key facts at issue caused the Court to have considerable reservations about admitting their evidence.  The Court of Appeal ultimately held that the finding of liability against Cadillac Fairview was based on an “erroneous admission of hearsay evidence on key, contested issues” and reversed the decision.

On motions for summary judgment, courts will expect the parties to put their best foot forward, including the nature and source of relevant evidence.  As can be seen in this case, a party’s failure to do so can have serious consequences.

Thanks for reading.

Garrett Horrocks

04 Jul

Watch what you do, you may be held accountable

Christina Canestraro Estate Litigation, Ethical Issues, Litigation, Passing of Accounts Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Noah Weisberg’s recent blog on the Court of Appeal decision in Dzelme v Dzelme, serves as a great reminder that ordering a passing of accounts remains in the discretion of the court.

Building on this idea of judicial discretion is the recent case of Dobis v Dobis recently heard and decided by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, whereby the court ordered a passing of accounts by a party who was deemed to have misappropriated funds from an estate asset.

Elizabeth commenced an application in her role as the estate trustee of her late husband’s estate. She sought, among other things, certain orders that would allow her to gain and maintain possession and control over one of the estate assets, a four unit rental property. She also sought an order requiring her son, Mark, to pass his accounts in respect of funds she alleged were misappropriated from the rental property.

Mark resided in one of the units of the rental property with his spouse, and alleged that it was his father’s intention that he maintain a life interest in the property. During the lifetime of the deceased, Mark acted as a manager/superintendent of the rental property in exchange for reduced rent. He also collected rent from one of the tenants and deposited the funds into a bank account owned jointly by his parents. Following his father’s death, Mark began diverting rent from the rental property to himself rather than depositing it in the joint account.

Despite requests from Elizabeth, Mark failed to properly account for the rental income. The accounting that was provided to Elizabeth was not supported by vouchers, and contained no detail of the expenses incurred. Elizabeth submitted that Mark had no legal or beneficial interest in the property, that he was holding the property hostage while unlawfully benefiting personally from the funds generated by the property, and that he failed to account for those funds.

In arriving at its decision, the court relied on the 2016 Ontario Superior Court decision in Net Connect Installations Inc. v. Mobile Zone Inc., which held that a court has jurisdiction to order an accounting where a party is deemed to have misappropriated funds.

Ultimately, Mark was compelled to pass his accounts for all monies received by him in connection with his management of the property. All this to say, watch what you do, because you may be held accountable.

Thank you for reading!

Christina Canestraro

27 Jun

What is the Limitation Period in Setting aside a Marriage Contract?

Noah Weisberg Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The recent Ontario Superior Court of Justice decision in F.K. v. E.A. addresses limitation periods and discoverability in the context of setting aside a marriage contract.

By way of background,  husband and wife began their relationship in 2000, cohabitating in June of 2004, and marrying on July 20, 2005.  Shortly before marriage, on July 14, 2005, the (soon to be) husband and wife entered into a marriage contract.  The marriage contract was prepared by the wife who obtained a template off the internet.  The husband and wife eventually separated on August 13, 2012.  A dispute arose over certain terms of the marriage contract.  The husband thereafter brought a claim on August 24, 2017 for spousal support, equalization, as well as setting aside the marriage contract.  Two of the issues that the Court addressed included whether (i) the relief sought to set aside the marriage contract is subject to the two year limitation period and, if so, (2) whether the husband brought his claim in time.

Regarding the first issue, the Court found that the husband’s claim to set aside the marriage contract is a claim as defined in section 1 of the Limitations Act and therefore subject to the two year limitation period.

As it relates to the second issue of discoverability, evidence was adduced that the husband met with a lawyer in October 2012 to discuss the dispute with his wife and certain legal issues arising with respect to the marriage contract.  Based on this evidence, the Court established that by that date at the latest, he first knew: that the injury, loss or damage had occurred; that the injury, loss or damage was caused by or contributed to by an act or omission; and, that the act or omission was that of the person against whom the claim is made.  The Court dismissed the husband’s claim finding that the two years began running the date he met with his lawyer.

 

Noah Weisberg 

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30 May

Instagram evidence key to claim against French rock star’s estate

Nick Esterbauer Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, In the News, Litigation, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent decision dealing with the estate of a French rock star highlights the potential relevance of social media evidence in estates matters.

Johnny Halliday, known as the “French Elvis”, died in 2017, leaving a Last Will and Testament that left his entire estate to his fourth wife, disinheriting his adult children from a previous marriage.  The New York Times reports that French law does not permit a testator to disinherit his or her children in such a manner, and the adult children made a claim against the estate on that basis.  The issue became whether the deceased singer had lived primarily in the United States or in France.

Halliday was active on Instagram, using the service to promote his albums and tours, as well as to share details of his personal life with fans.  The adult children were, accordingly, able to track where their father had been located in the years leading up to his death, establishing that he had lived in France for 151 days in 2015 and 168 in 2016, before spending 7 months immediately preceding his death in France.  Their position based on the social media evidence was preferred over that of Halliday’s widow and their claims against the estate were permitted.

Decisions like this raise the issue of whether parties to estate litigation can be required to produce the contents of their social media profiles as relevant evidence to the issues in dispute.  Arguably, within the context of estates, social media evidence may be particularly relevant to dependant’s support applications, where the nature of an alleged dependant’s relationship with the deceased, along with the lifestyle enjoyed prior to death, may be well-documented.

The law regarding the discoverability of social media posts in estate and family law in Canada is still developing.  While the prevalence of social media like Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook is undeniable, services like these have not become popular only in the last fifteen years or so and it seems that users continue to share increasingly intimate parts of their lives online.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

28 May

Legal Aid Funding and Access to Justice

Nick Esterbauer Elder Law, Estate & Trust, General Interest, In the News, Litigation, Support After Death Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Sydney Osmar‘s blog from yesterday covered the issue of the recent cuts to legal aid funding, which can only be expected to result in increased barriers to Ontario residents in accessing the court system.

Within the context of estates, high legal fees may contribute to the inability of (would-be) litigants to obtain able assistance in accessing the court system.  Some meritorious estate and capacity-related litigation may not be commenced simply because of a lack of funds required to hire a lawyer to assist in doing so.

While successful parties may be awarded some portion of the legal fees that they have incurred, payable by the unsuccessful party to the litigation (or out of the assets of the estate), recovery of all legal fees incurred in pursuing litigation is rare.  The balance of legal fees that a party can be expected to pay out of whatever benefit they may ultimately receive dependent on the outcome of the litigation may eliminate some or all of the financial benefit of the funds that they may stand to receive.

For example, a dependant’s support application brought by a surviving spouse who lacks the financial means to support him or herself may result in protracted litigation.  Even if the application for dependant’s support is successful, the court may not always make an order that adequately reflects the entitlements of the dependant and the total fees that he or she has incurred to bring the application, limiting the funds available for the dependant’s expenses going forward.  While interim support orders or orders directing payments toward professional fees related to bringing the application may be available during litigation in some circumstances, the related motions will serve to further increase the legal fees incurred by the applicant if such relief is not obtained on consent.  In the absence of contribution from the assets of the estate to fund the litigation or an alternative arrangement for the payment of legal fees, it may not be possible for a surviving spouse in need to make a dependant’s support claim in the first place or he or she may need to do so without a lawyer’s assistance.

In 2016, it was reported that the numbers of self-represented litigants in Canada have increased over the last two decades and more significantly in recent years.  The inability to afford a lawyer and ineligibility for legal aid assistance were cited as the primary reasons why a party is self-represented.  Research suggests that parties who are self-represented are less likely to be successful in litigation (with success rates of only 4% in responding to motions for summary judgment, 12.5% for motions and applications, and 14% at trial) than represented parties.

While assistance with estate-related matters may be available to some from the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly, the Queen’s University Elder Law Clinic, or other clinics (which are funded by Legal Aid Ontario and will be impacted by the recent budget cuts) in some circumstances, many individuals simply do not qualify for assistance or require assistance that is not provided by these clinics.

Our colleague, The Honourable R. Roy McMurtry, is a strong advocate for access to justice and has expressed the following sentiment: “[O]ur freedoms are at best fragile…they depend on the ability of every citizen to assert in a court or tribunal their rights under law as well as receiving sound legal advice as to their obligations.  Indeed, our laws and freedoms will only be as strong as the protection that they afford to the most vulnerable members of society.”

Unfortunately, greater numbers of individuals than previously may struggle to access just resolutions of estates and other matters as a result of the recent changes to legal aid funding in Ontario.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

02 May

Practical Tips from the Bench

Garrett Horrocks Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, General Interest, Litigation 0 Comments

I recently had the good fortune of attending a dinner hosted by the Ontario Bar Association along with several members of the Toronto estates list Bench.  The judges were kind enough to share a few pearls of wisdom with respect to practice tips and elicit some of the dos and don’ts of appearing before them. A few of the most salient points are highlighted in this blog.

Confirmation Forms

The Rules of Civil Procedure provide that parties to a proceeding are to file a confirmation form with the court no later than 2:00pm three days prior to the hearing in order to ensure that a particular matter is properly scheduled.  The form allows sets out several options to be selected by counsel regarding the purpose or anticipated outcome of the attendance.

However, in order to improve judicial efficiency, the Bench has asked that if counsel will be seeking the court’s assistance in resolving certain minor contested issues, a short description of these issues should be attached with the confirmation form.  Particularly in the case of short scheduling appointments, which only typically last ten minutes, advising the court of relevant issues ahead of time will ensure a productive use of the attendance.

Case Conferences

The Bench has also professed the benefits of scheduling case conferences before a judge with a view to resolving or otherwise narrowing the issues to be tried in a given matter.  Case conferences typically follow the format of short scheduling appointments, though with significantly more time allotted to these attendances on the understanding that they are to be used to resolve substantive rather than procedural issues.

Ideally, the bench would like to see counsel attend such conferences prior to scheduling motions or hearings that would be dispositive of a proceeding or of certain issues, such as motions for summary judgment.  In most cases, the opportunity for counsel to obtain the advice and direction of a judge while avoiding the significant costs of preparing for a motion can be a helpful step towards resolution.

Probate Issues

On the administrative side, the Bench was kind enough to release a list of the most common errors in applications for certificates of appointment as raised by court staff.  In no particular order, the court strongly encourages the following practical tips:

  1. Ensure parties are correctly and consistently identified throughout the application, especially if a party identifies under a different name or a pseudonym.
  2. Ensure the names of parties and entities are spelled correctly.
  3. If a particular section of the application does not apply on the facts, do not leave that section blank.  Instead, expressly indicate that the section is not applicable.
  4. Ensure all exhibits included as part of the application, especially the Last Will and Testament that is the subject of the application, are stamped with an exhibit stamp and commissioned.
  5. Ensure the commissioner includes their full name below their signature.

These are only a few of the many tips shared by the judiciary, but they are as much to the benefit of the court as they are to counsel.  Great advocacy is equal parts assisting your client and assisting the court.

Thanks for reading.

Garrett Horrocks

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