Category: Estate Litigation

01 Jun

Toller James Montague Cranston (Estate of): Lose Big, Pay Big

Arielle Di Iulio Estate Litigation, Litigation Tags: , , 0 Comments

As in other areas of civil litigation, the general costs principle of “loser pays” applies in estate litigation. The recent costs decision of Toller James Montague Cranston (Estate of), 2021 ONSC 3704, is an interesting example of just how much a loser in estate litigation could have to pay.

In Toller, the Estate Trustee of the estate of Toller Cranston was compelled to bring an application to pass her accounts by the two other beneficiaries of the estate. These beneficiaries (the “Objectors“) raised over 300 objections to various expenses paid by the Estate Trustee personally to administer the estate in Mexico. The Objectors were unsuccessful on all of their objections except for five. They also made allegations of fraud and theft by the Estate Trustee which were ultimately unproven. The Estate Trustee sought costs on a substantial indemnity scale of $390,602.98 inclusive of HST and disbursements, payable by the Objectors personally. The Objectors took the position that the requested amount was not reasonable or proportionate in the circumstances.

In his costs decision, the Honourable Justice Robert Smith relied on the factors set out in Rule 57 of the Rules of Civil Procedure to help determine the appropriate costs award to make. He also relied on the case of Estate of Francoise Poitras v. Canadian Cancer Society, 2021 ONSC 406, for a summary of the legal principles applicable to costs in estate litigation, which include:

  • An estate trustee is generally entitled to be indemnified for all reasonably incurred costs in the administration of an estate, including the legal costs of an action reasonably defended, to the extent these costs are not recovered from another person.
  • The winning party in estate litigation is usually entitled to reasonable costs from the losing party.
  • A court may deny cost recovery by an estate trustee, in whole or in part, if the trustee acted unreasonably or in substance for his or her own benefit, rather than for the benefit of the estate.
  • If the estate trustee acted reasonably, the court may require the other party or parties to pay costs or make a blended order requiring the losing party to pay some costs and the estate to pay the balance.
  • In fixing costs, the court must determine the fair and reasonable amount that a party should pay in the particular circumstances of the case.

In the case at hand, the Estate Trustee won by a landslide. What is more, given the complexity of the estate and the large number of objections raised, the Estate Trustee was forced to spend a significant amount of time and legal expenses to respond to the 295 meritless objections that had been raised. Justice Smith also found that the Objectors acted unreasonably in refusing to narrow the issues to be decided before the hearing and to then abandon approximately half of their objections at the hearing, after time and expenses had already been incurred on those objections. The Objectors’ unfounded allegations of misconduct by the Estate Trustee also warranted an elevated costs award.  For these reasons and more, Justice Smith concluded that the bulk of the Estate Trustee’s legal costs should be paid by the Objectors.

It was ultimately decided that the Objectors would pay costs to the Estate Trustee on a substantial indemnity basis, reduced by an amount to account for the Objectors’ partial success. This resulted in a notably high costs award of $325,000.00, inclusive of disbursements and HST, payable to the Estate Trustee by the Objectors. It was further ordered that the balance of the Estate Trustee’s legal costs be paid to her from the estate.

The Toller decision shows that the court will not shy away from holding a losing party personally liable for significant costs in estate disputes where the court deems such an award to be appropriate in its discretion. To help limit personal liability to costs in the event of a loss, parties should endeavour to act reasonably from the beginning through to the end of the litigation.

Thanks for reading!

Arielle Di Iulio

13 May

The Doctrine of Righteousness and Its Place in Estate Litigation

Kira Domratchev Estate Litigation, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

The doctrine of righteousness is a historical concept that is interesting to consider in the context of estate litigation.

Apparently, it was first developed in the 1800s to protect will-makers from consequences of the actions of those attempting to gain a benefit from another’s Will, specifically through the exercise of undue influence.

The case law on this particular concept is quite sparse.

This doctrine was considered by the Supreme Court of Canada (“SCC”) in Riach v Ferris, [1934] SCR 725 where the case of Barry v Butlin was reviewed. It was mentioned in passing by the British Columbia Supreme Court in Halliday v Halliday Estate, 2019 BCSC 554, without any significant commentary as to its effect or place in a Will challenge.

A more in-depth analysis of this doctrine, however, was provided by the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal (“SKCA”) in the decision of Karpinski v Zookewich Estate, 2018 SKCA 56.

The SKCA held that this doctrine may apply where a person, who is “instrumental” in the drafting of the will, also receives a benefit from the will greater than the other beneficiaries. In that case, there may be a requirement for such a recipient to prove the “righteousness” of the transaction.

The SKCA further noted that the SCC also stated that these rules of law apply to all circumstances that raise the “suspicion” of the Court and not only where a person who is instrumental in the drafting of the Will receives a superior benefit. According to the SKCA, this may suggest that this doctrine is only an example of the Court finding a certain kind of relationship to be a suspicious circumstance such that the burden of proof shifts to the propounder of the Will.

The SKCA’s comments are in contrast to John Poyser’s position set out in his book entitled “Capacity and Undue Influence” where he relays his views that the doctrine of righteousness is its own unique doctrine and ought not to be confused with the concept of suspicious circumstances.

Thanks for reading!

Kira Domratchev

Find this blogs interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

Court of Appeal Reiterates the Test for Undue Influence

Proving a Will Executed Under Suspicious Circumstances

A Question of Fact: Will Challenges and Mistaken Belief

04 May

Motions for Leave to Amend: What to Consider

Hull & Hull LLP Estate Litigation Tags: , , , 0 Comments

In yesterday’s blog, I considered how to define the “closing of pleadings” in the context of applications.  As an aside, I noted that the Rules of Civil Procedure allow a party to amend a pleading without leave of the Court until such time as pleadings have closed.  The corollary that flows from yesterday’s blog is, of course, the question of what steps are to be taken by the parties and the Court when pleadings have closed and a party nonetheless moves to amend a pleading.

Rule 26.01 would seem to be the appropriate place to start, as it provides that the Court “shall grant leave to amend a pleading on such terms as are just”, unless such an amendment would result in prejudice that cannot be compensated by an award of costs or an adjournment.  Although this Rule employs mandatory language suggesting that leave is to be granted except in discrete circumstances, the case law suggests the analysis is slightly more nuanced.

In Marks v Ottawa (City), the Court of Appeal considered an appeal of a lower court decision to deny the plaintiffs leave to effect certain amendments to a statement of claim while allowing others.  The plaintiffs had brought a motion to amend a statement of claim with a view to amending existing claims and also introducing four new claims.  The lower court granted only partial relief.

On appeal, the Court of Appeal noted that although Rule 26.01 provides that amendments are “presumptively approved” given the mandatory language of the Rule, the Court nonetheless retains a “residual right to deny amendments where appropriate.”  The Court provided a list of factors that are to be considered on a motion for leave to amend.

Notably, and consistent with the language of Rule 26.01, the Court should allow pleadings to be amended unless such amendments “would cause an injustice not compensable in costs.”  Moreover, the proposed amendment must be shown to be “an issue worth of trial and prima facie meritorious.”  Conversely, an amendment should not be allowed if it would have been struck had it been included in the initial form of the pleading.  Finally, the proposed amendment must contain “sufficient particulars.”

Although the first factor is intended to be broad in scope, the remaining three are interrelated and compel the Court to consider the merits and the particulars of additional claims being sought in deciding whether leave should be granted.  Although the Court would effectively be performing a gatekeeping function in doing so, the Court is already empowered to perform a similar function with respect to claims raised in an original pleading.  , for example, specifically empowers the Court to determine a discrete issue or question of law prior to a trial, or to strike a pleading entirely on the basis that it discloses no reasonable cause of action.  Granting the Court the ability to perform a similar function with respect to claims to be raised in an amended pleading is merely an extension of its existing authority.

Thanks for reading.

Garrett Horrocks

03 May

Amending Applications and the “Close of Pleadings”

Hull & Hull LLP Estate Litigation, Executors and Trustees, Hull on Estates, Litigation Tags: , , 0 Comments

Litigation is a fluid exercise.  Often, proceedings are commenced by a party with only limited or rudimentary knowledge of the facts giving rise to a particular cause of action.  As additional information is discovered, parties may wish to particularize the details of certain claims, or introduce new claims altogether.

The Rules of Civil Procedure permit a claimant to do so without leave of the Court, but only so long as “pleadings are not closed.”  The close of pleadings is a term of art that, in the context of actions, is clearly defined by a plain reading of the Rules.  However, in the context of applications, the Rules are not so clear, and guidance from the Court is required.  The recent decision in Angeloni v Estate of Francesco Angeloni summarized the relevant authorities on this issue.

This case consisted of an application initially commenced by the alternate attorneys for property (eventually litigation guardians and, ultimately, estate trustees) for Concetta Angeloni, concerning the use of the proceeds of sale of a property by her deceased husband and prior attorney for property, Francesco.  At a time when Concetta was incapable of managing her property, Francesco, as her prior attorney for property, severed the joint tenancy in a property previously owned by them, sold the property and, it was later discovered, retained all of the net proceeds of sale personally.  In reviewing Concetta’s affairs following Francesco’s death, Concetta’s alternate attorneys for property soon realized that she did not appear to have received any share of the proceeds of sale, nor had Francesco made any provision for her in his Will.

Concetta’s attorneys for property commenced an application for dependant’s support against the Estate.  However, only after this application was commenced did they confirm that Francesco had retained the sale proceeds entirely.  The litigation guardians quickly amended the application seeking additional relief including an accounting as well as a declaration that Francesco had breached his fiduciary duty to Concetta.

The estate asserted that the relief sought in the amended application was not properly before the Court on the basis that the Notice of Application had not been “properly amended.”  The Court disagreed.  At the outset, the Court found that although a Notice of Application is not a pleading for the purposes of the Rules in the same vein as a Statement of Claim, the same rules with respect to the amendment of pleadings apply nonetheless.

The Court also noted that although Rule 25.05 defines the “close of pleadings” as being when the last Reply to a defence is served or the time to do so has expired, no equivalent definition in the context of applications is provided – a Reply is a pleading that may only be delivered in an action.

The Court considered the decision of the Court of Appeal in 1100997 Ontario Limited v North Elgin Centre Inc.  In that case, the Court held that the affidavit materials filed by the parties, and not the Notice of Application, are to be considered the “pleadings” for the purposes of Rule 25.05, as it is the affidavits that contain the relevant facts in support of the relief sought in the Notice of Application.  As such, a supporting affidavit would be considered part of an applicant’s pleadings, while a responding affidavit would be considered part of the respondent’s.

Accordingly, the Court found that at the time the Notice of Application was amended, pleadings had not yet closed as the Estate had not delivered a responding affidavit.  In any event, the Court noted that the responding affidavit eventually filed ultimately responded to the claims raised in the amended application and, as such, the Estate could not now take the position that those claims were not properly before the Court.

The Court concluded that the applicants did not require leave of the Court to amend the Notice of Application, that the Notice of Application had been properly amended, and that the additional claims could be (and were) determined by the Court.

Thanks for reading.

Garrett Horrocks

20 Apr

What Evidence is needed to Rebut the Presumption of Resulting Trust?

Rebecca Kennedy Estate Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

When a parent transfers assets to an adult child, the rebuttable presumption of resulting trust will apply to that transfer. Unless the child can rebut the presumption, it will be presumed that the child was holding the transferred assets in trust for the parent.

But what kind of evidence will be needed to rebut the presumption? Ideally there would be some kind of documentation made contemporaneously with the transfer to support the parent’s intention. If the documentation is lacking, there may be evidentiary issues where the parent has passed away or is incapable, and is not able to give evidence as to his or her intention at the time of the transfer.

In the recent decision of Pandke Estate v Lauzon, 2021 ONSC 123, the court considered two cheques paid by a mother, Carol, to her adult son and daughter-in-law, Steven and Marnee, in the amounts of $35,000.00 and $90,000.00, respectively, shortly before her death. The court reviewed the evidence in determining whether the presumption of resulting trust was rebutted, or whether Carol had intended the cheques to be gifts.

Carol was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer in 2017, and died about a month following her diagnosis. At the time that she was diagnosed, she lived with her husband, William, to whom she had been married since 1992. Following her diagnosis, it was decided that Carol would move in with Steven and Marnee, as William was not physically capable of providing her the care that she would require. Shortly after moving in with Steven and Marnee, Carol provided a cheque in the amount of $35,000.00, payable to Marnee, with a note on the cheque stating that it was “For Rent”. Four days later Carol provided another cheque payable to Steven, in the amount of $90,000.00, with the note on the cheque stating “Medical Expenses”. The total value of the two cheques constituted the majority of Carol’s liquid assets. William, who was the sole beneficiary of Carol’s estate, challenged these payments following Carol’s death.

The court found that the $35,000.00 payment was intended to be a gift by Carol to Steven and Marnee. Part of the evidence on which the court’s conclusion in this regard was based was Marnee’s hearsay evidence of what Carol had told her about why she was making the payment, being that Steven had left his job to care for Carol and she did not want him to suffer financially as a result. The court found that Marnee’s hearsay evidence could be admitted, notwithstanding that it was hearsay, on the basis that it fell within a traditional exception to the hearsay rule (that the statement is adduced to demonstrate the intentions or state of mind of the declarant at the time the statement was made) and under the principled approach to hearsay evidence as it met the necessity and reliability requirements. The court also found that Marnee’s evidence was corroborated by independent evidence.

However, with respect to the $90,000.00 payment, the court found that there was insufficient evidence to rebut the presumption of resulting trust. Although the court admitted Steven’s evidence of statements made by Carol to him as to her state of mind at the time the cheque was signed, the court also raised other concerns with Steven’s evidence. For instance, the reference to “Medical Expenses” noted on the cheque was concerning, as there were no medical expenses, and the court wondered why Carol would not have simply indicated that it was a gift if that is what she intended it to be. The court was also not convinced by a statement that Steven said was made by Carol that she was making the payment because she did not want Steven to suffer financially because he had left work to care for her, given that only a few days before Carol had made the $35,000.00 payment, which paid off Steven’s truck loan, line of credit, and left around $15,000.00 cash to spare. There was also no corroborating evidence of Carol’s intention to gift the $90,000.00 amount to Steven. As a result, Steven held the $90,000.00 in trust for Carol’s estate.

Unfortunately, it is often the case that payments to adult children are challenged after the parent has died. Unless the parent has taken special care to document his or her intention in making the payment, the intention can be difficult to determine with any degree of certainty. Accordingly, a parent making a gift to an adult child should consider seeking legal advice as to the best way to document such a transfer in order to ensure that their intentions will be upheld. From the opposite perspective, if a parent wants to make a transfer on the basis that their adult child will hold the asset in trust for him or her, or his or her estate, the parent should also consider seeking legal advice to ensure that this is properly documented in order to reduce the chance of issues arising in this regard after his or her death.

Thanks for reading,

Rebecca Rauws

 

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08 Apr

Incapacity to Sue under section 7 of the Limitations Act, 2002

Doreen So Capacity, Continuing Legal Education, Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Ethical Issues, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

The basic limitation period under section 4 of the Limitations Act, 2002 provides that a proceeding shall not be commenced in respect of a claim after the second anniversary of the day on which the claim was discovered.  However, pursuant to section 7(1) of the Act,  the “clock” does not run when the person with the claim,

(a)  is incapable of commencing a proceeding in respect of the claim because of his or her physical, mental or psychological condition; and

(b)  is not represented by a litigation guardian in relation to the claim.

A person is also presumed to be capable of commencing a proceeding in respect of a claim at all time unless the contrary is proved (section 7(2)), although minors are dealt with separately under section 6 of the Act.

The issue of the plaintiff’s capacity to commence a proceeding in respect of his claim was considered at length by the Court of Appeal in Carmichael v. GlaxoSmithKline Inc., 2020 ONCA 447Carmichael is a tragic case involving the murder of the plaintiff’s 11 year old son.  The plaintiff strangled his son to death in 2004 when he was suffering from mental illness and psychotic delusions.  During this time, the plaintiff was also taking an anti-depressant that was manufactured by the defendant drug company.  The plaintiff was charged with murder and he was found to be not criminally responsible as a result of his mental disorder.  He later received an absolute discharge from the Ontario Review Board on December 2, 2009.  Nearly two years after that, the plaintiff commenced his claims against the drug company on October 5, 2011.

The defendant drug company brought a motion for summary judgment to dismiss the plaintiff’s claim as statute barred.  The motions judge dismissed the motion because he found that the plaintiff was incapable of commencing a proceeding because of his psychological condition until the day of his absolute discharge from the Ontario Review Board.  The Court of Appeal disagreed.

The Court of Appeal affirmed the use of the Huang/Hengeveld indicators as a list of non-exhaustive, objectively verifiable indicators of incapacity under section 7(1)(a) of the Act (see paras. 94-96):

  • a person’s ability to know or understand the minimum choices or decisions required to make them;
  • an appreciation of the consequences and effects of his or her choices or decisions;
  • an appreciation of the nature of the proceedings;
  • a person’s ability to choose and keep counsel;
  • a person’s ability to represent him or herself;
  • a person’s ability to distinguish between the relevant and irrelevant issues; and,
  • a person’s mistaken beliefs regarding the law or court procedures.

Moreover, the plaintiff’s physical, mental, or psychological condition must be the cause for the incapacity in order to meet section 7(1)(a).  The incapacity cannot arise from other sources, such as lack of sophistication, education, or cultural differences (para. 101).

The Court of Appeal ultimately found that the plaintiff had the capacity to sue the defendant drug company prior to his absolute discharge from the Ontario Review Board.  The Court disagreed with the motions judge’s view of the plaintiff’s expert evidence.  The plaintiff’s expert witness was criticized for never having prepared a capacity assessment before and for making conclusions that were unsupported by the evidence.  Rather,

“The evidence shows that Mr. Carmichael had several reasons for not suing GSK before December 2, 2009: he did not believe he had the necessary expert evidence until he received the genetic test from Dr. Lucire in October 2009; he was worried about repercussions if the Hospital decided that he was not taking responsibility for his actions; and he was concerned for his own and his family’s well-being. These are understandable reasons for not commencing a lawsuit. But in my view, none of these reasons, alone or together, prove that Mr. Carmichael was incapable of suing GSK until December 2, 2009 because of his psychological condition.” (para. 163)

Leave to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada was denied last week.

Thanks for reading!

Doreen So

06 Apr

How to Deal with the Two-Year Limitation Period under Section 38(3) of the Trustee Act

Doreen So Estate Litigation, Executors and Trustees, Litigation, Uncategorized Tags: , , 0 Comments

Section 38 of the Trustee Act, except in cases of libel and slander, permits estate trustees to commence actions, on the deceased’s behalf, for all torts or injuries to the person or to the property of the deceased, and vice versa for those seeking to commence actions with respect to a wrong committed by a deceased person, so long as those claims are brought within two years of the deceased’s death.

The discoverability principles under the Limitations Act, 2002 are not applicable to toll the two-year limitation period under section 38(3) of the Trustee Act.  The application of this strict two-year limitation period is only mitigated by common law principles such as the doctrine of fraudulent concealment: Giroux Estate v. Trillium Health Centre, 2005 CanLII 1488 (ONCA), Bikur Cholim Jewish Volunteer Services v. Penna Estate, 2009 ONCA 196, and  Levesque v. Crampton Estate, 2017 ONCA 455.

Turning off an alarm clock

Recently, the Court of Appeal has considered limitations defences in three of its estates decisions so far in 2021.  One of them was the case of Zachariadis Estate v. Giannopoulos, 2021 ONCA 158, which I blogged about the other day.  The other two cases were Beaudoin Estate v. Campbellford Memorial Hospital, 2021 ONCA 57, and Hayward v. Hayward, 2021 ONCA 175.

The Beaudoin Estate is a medical malpractice claim by the Beaudoin Estate and the deceased’s wife, daughter, grandchildren as claimants under the Family Law Act.  The claimants alleged that the deceased was negligently diagnosed and treated when he was brought to the hospital’s emergency department which led to a delay in surgery that could have saved his life.  Mr. Beaudoin died on January 9, 2015 and the action as commenced on April 27, 2017 by way of a statement of claim.  The defendants asserted amongst other things in their statement of defence that the plaintiffs were statue barred pursuant to section 38(3) of the Trustee Act.  The plaintiffs then alleged that the hospital had fraudulently concealed their cause of action by failing to provide them with the deceased’s complete medical records when they were requested from the hospital, particularly certain CT imaging that was not provided to them until May, 2017.

The hospital then brought a rule 21.01(1)(a) motion to determine an issue of law raised by the pleadings so as to dispose of the action without trial.  It is important to note that, unlike a motion for summary judgment under Rule 20, no evidence is admissible on a motion under r. 21.01(1)(a), except with leave of a judge or on consent of the parties: r. 21.01(2)(a).

The Court of Appeal found that the motion judge erred in deciding the question of fraudulent concealment as a question of law under r. 21.01(2)(a).  Motions under r. 21.01(1)(a) are not the proper procedural vehicle for weighing evidence or making findings of fact (para. 30).  Similar to limitations issues under the Limitations Act, 2002 and the factual dispute surrounding the discovery of a claim, factual disputes surrounding the fraudulent concealment of a cause of action are more properly determined under a motion for summary judgment under Rule 20.  To do so would be unfair to a plaintiff when no evidence is admissible on such a motion except with leave of the court or on consent (para. 34).

In Hayward v. Hayward, the appellants raised as a ground of appeal that the trial judge erred by failing to find that the applicants were statute bared.  The Court of Appeal dismissed this ground of appeal on the basis that the defence was not raised by counsel regardless of the fact that the application did not have full pleadings like an action would.  The trial judge cannot be criticized for failing to respond to a defence that was not raised by counsel (para. 7).

Thanks for reading!

Doreen So

05 Apr

A Tale of Substantial Indemnity: Zachariadis Estate v. Giannopoulos

Doreen So Continuing Legal Education, Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Executors and Trustees, Litigation, Uncategorized Tags: , , 0 Comments

Dr. Zachariadis was divorced and estranged from his two daughters.  After his divorce, he began a romantic relationship with Ms. Giannopoulos.  They were together for almost twenty years as common law spouses until Dr. Zachariadis’ passing.  A year before his death, Dr. Zachariadis moved in with Ms. Giannopoulos and they had plans to marry.  Dr. Zachariadis transferred his medical practice to Ms. Giannopoulos’ son Aris, and he gave Ms. Giannopoulos a bank draft for $700,000.00 which she deposited into her own bank account.  He died within six months of that bank draft.

Dr. Zachariadis did not have a relationship with his daughters from his first marriage.  He was not invited to their weddings and he has never met his grandchildren.  Dr. Zachariadis died without a Will and his daughters became the estate trustees and beneficiaries of this Estate.  More than two years after Dr. Zachariadis’ passing, the daughters commenced an action against Ms. Giannopoulos to recover the payment of $700,000.00 to her on the basis of breach of trust, fraud at equity, conversion and unjust enrichment.  The action was dismissed on a motion of summary judgment by Justice Koehnen.  The appeal of Justice Koehnen’s decision, 2019 ONSC 6505, and his Honour’s costs order, 2020 ONSC 588, were also dismissed by the Court of Appeal, 2021 ONCA 158.

 

On the motion for summary judgment, Justice Koehnen found that the daughters were statute barred by section 38(3) of the Trustee Act in failing to commence their claims within two years of Dr. Zachariadis’ death.  The daughters failed to make out any fraudulent concealment on Ms. Giannopoulos’ part that would toll the operation of section 38(3).  Rather, Justice Koehnen found that there was no positive obligation on Ms. Giannopoulos’ part to tell the daughters about the payment, and he found that the payment was a gift in any event.  All of which were upheld by the Court of Appeal.

The Court of Appeal also found that there was no basis to interfere with Justice Koehnen’s costs order.  The Estate and the daughters, in their personal capacities, were ordered to pay Giannopoulos costs of $199,602.46 on a substantial indemnity scale.   The allegations of fraud in the underlying claim were unsupported and pursued to the end.  Justice Koehnen noted that the daughters could have pursued their claims on the basis of constructive trust and resulting trust without going so far as alleging fraud.  The daughters were also found to have taken unnecessarily aggressive steps and to have lengthened the proceeding due to their lack of cooperation with Ms. Giannopoulos’ counsel while Ms. Giannopoulos’ offers to settle were weighed against them.  Issue was also taken with the length of the daughters’ materials which were noted to be in violation of the page limits and other formatting requirements for facta.    Lastly, Justice Koehnen rejected the daughters’ argument that they were only pursuing the claim to ensure the due administration of the Estate and out of their concern that the Estate would have sufficient funds to pay its CRA liability. Interestingly enough, Justice Koehnen commented that, if that were the case, the daughters could have simply turned over the claim for CRA to pursue.

Thanks for reading!

Doreen So 

15 Mar

Model Orders for the Estates List in the Toronto Region!  

Sanaya Mistry Capacity, Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Guardianship, Litigation, Passing of Accounts, Power of Attorney, Support After Death, Trustees, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The Consolidated Practice Direction Concerning the Estates List in the Toronto Region was established for the hearing of certain proceedings involving estate, trust and capacity law, applying to matters on the Estates List in the Toronto Region.

As of March 9, 2021, Part VII (Contested Matters – Estates) of this practice direction was amended to make reference to model orders prepared by the Estate List Users’ Committee.

Generally, parties are expected to take the time and care to prepare proposed orders giving directions for consideration by the court. If the parties are unable to agree upon an order giving directions and a contested motion for directions is required, each party must file a copy of the draft order giving directions it is seeking with its motion materials.

 

In addition to providing requirements for what orders giving directions should address, where applicable, this practice direction now includes the following model orders:

  1. Order Giving Directions – Appointment of Section 3 Counsel
  2. Order Giving Directions – Power of Attorney/Guardianship Disputes
  3. Order Giving Directions – Will Challenge
  4. Order Giving Directions – Dependant’s Support
  5. Order Giving Directions – Passing of Accounts

 

As noted in the practice direction, the preparation of draft orders for consideration by the court will greatly expedite the issuance of orders.  Where the relevant model orders have been approved by the Estate List Users’ Committee, a copy of the draft order showing all variations sought from the model order must be filed.

The addition of model orders can greatly benefit the Estates List in the Toronto Region. Among other things, these model orders provide a baseline for all parties, such that it can significantly reduce drafting time and potential disagreements on wording among parties, which in turn can increase efficiency and reduce costs.

Many thanks to the Estate List Users’ Committee for their time and efforts in preparing these model orders!

Thank you for reading.

 

Sanaya Mistry

11 Mar

Dewaele v Roobroeck: The Costs of Bad Conduct

Arielle Di Iulio Estate Litigation, Litigation Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Estate litigation can be expensive. Sometimes a court may award costs to be paid personally by a party in an estates matter. Parties should always try to act reasonably throughout the litigation, as anything less may attract such adverse costs consequences. A recent example of this is the case of Dewaele v. Roobroeck, 2021 ONSC 1604.

The underlying application arose from the inability of three siblings to agree on how the estates of their late parents should be administered. The siblings were the sole beneficiaries and co-estate trustees of their parents’ estates. The daughter of the deceased parents brought an application against her two brothers seeking various relief, including an order removing them as co-estate trustees and appointing her as the sole estate trustee. Her application was successful and she sought costs against her brothers. Specifically, the applicant sought an order that her substantial indemnity costs be paid by her brothers and that the balance of her full indemnity costs be paid by the estates.

The decision on the issue of costs was given by the Honourable Justice Sheard, who held in favour of the applicant. In her written reasons, Justice Sheard provides a concise summary of the law governing the determination of cost awards in estates matters. First, she cites s.131 of the Courts of Justice Act,  R.S.O. 1990, c. C.43 as amended, which provides that, subject to the provisions of an Act or rules of court, the court has discretion to determine by whom and to what extent costs should be paid. The factors set out in Rule 57.01 of the Rules of Civil Procedure, R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 194 guide the court’s exercise of this discretion. The overriding objective in a cost award is that it be fair and reasonable, which is, in part, determined by the reasonable expectations of the parties concerning the quantum of costs.

Justice Sheard further explains that in estate litigation, the general rule is that estate trustees are entitled to be indemnified for costs reasonably incurred in the administration of the estate. However, the “loser pays” costs regime applies to estate matters, and a blended cost award – in which a portion of the costs is paid by the litigants and a portion from the estate – is within the court’s discretion.

In this case, the applicant asked for substantial indemnity costs from her respondent brothers. Justice Sheard affirms at paragraph 19 of her decision that such an award may be made “where the losing party has engaged in behaviour worthy of sanction”. Moreover, elevated costs should only be awarded where “there has been reprehensible, scandalous or outrageous conduct on the part of one of the parties”. Here, the respondents failed in their obligations as estate trustees, deliberately interfered with the applicant’s ability to complete the administration of the estates, and failed to comply with previous court orders made. Justice Sheard found that this conduct was worthy of sanction and can be characterized as reprehensible and outrageous. As such, an elevated costs award was appropriate. Justice Sheard ultimately decided that the applicant was entitled to be fully indemnified for the costs she incurred in respect of the application, with the respondents liable to pay the majority of these costs (and the balance to be paid from the assets of the estates).

This costs decision is an excellent reminder of the importance of acting reasonably in estate litigation. If any party, including an estate trustee, chooses to act unreasonably then they may pay for it in the end.

Thanks for reading!

Arielle Di Iulio

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  • The @LawSocietyLSO provides assistance and guidance when you are trying to locate a Will. Read Last Friday's artic… https://t.co/hoJIrdbDVe
  • Thompson and Virtual Litigation Today's article explores the questions surrounding the fate of virtual litigation.… https://t.co/nQ4KgbPP2V
  • Last Thursday's article: Applying the new standard for limitation periods. Read the full blog here:… https://t.co/tiPOz7skaK
  • Improving Dispute Resolution for the Last Stages of Life Read today's full article exploring the, Last Stages of L… https://t.co/7fWx7b9PDi
  • Planning for Blended Families Read last Wednesday's blog, which explores the unique challenges presented when esta… https://t.co/7G0LI8QAGX