An Electronic Will is Good in British Columbia!

August 13, 2020 James Jacuta Wills Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

In Hubschi Estate 2019 BCSC 2040, it was found that the notation left on a computer by the deceased was sufficient to be ordered as his valid electronic will.

Mr. Justice Armstrong reviews the facts and the law in a sixteen-page decision which includes the following paragraphs edited for brevity:

On Mr. Hubschi’s death, his family did not find a will meeting the requirements of the Wills, Estates and Succession Act, S.B.C. 2009, c. 13 (WESA). His family did, however, find a document/record on a computer in his home indicating as follows:

“Get a will made out at some point. A 5-way assets split for remaining brother and sisters. Greg, Annette or Trevor as executor”.

The document does not meet the formal requirements of the Wills Estates and Succession Act (WESA). The issue on this application is whether the document can be cured, pursuant to s. 58 of WESA. If the document can be cured, Mr. Hubschi’s significant assets will be distributed to the foster siblings he grew up with in accordance with the intentions set out in the document. If the document cannot be cured, Mr. Hubschi has died intestate, and his assets will be distributed, in accordance with s. 23 of WESA, to blood relatives in Switzerland with whom he had no relationship.

Although the words in his computer record contemplate preparation of a formal will at some time in the future, I conclude that Mr. Hubschi’s testamentary intentions were reflected at the time he created the computer entry and when he reviewed the document on the day he died…

Thus, although the deceased’s words are noncompliant with the provisions in WESA, I conclude that it was the deceased’s testamentary intention that his estate should be divided by “A 5 – way split for remaining brother and sisters.”

I order that the document prepared by Mr. Hubschi will be fully effective as though it had been made as the testamentary intention of Mr. Hubschi and that probate of the will be granted to Gregory Kenneth Stack on the basis each of the Stack children will receive a one-fifth interest in his estate.

It should be noted that, at present, the governing legislation in Ontario is significantly different than in British Columbia. In Ontario, laws would not allow the judge the discretion to make a decision like this. Ontario is a “strict compliance” jurisdiction, and the note left by the deceased on his computer would not be a valid will. In Ontario, the result would have been an intestacy. Then the Office of Public Guardian and Trustee of Ontario would likely distribute the estate to the legal heirs in Switzerland. This was clearly not the result the deceased had intended as he had been given for adoption by his mother at birth and had no contact with his blood relations in Switzerland. It was his foster siblings who he had lived with all of his life, and he wanted to leave his estate to them on his death.

In this particular case, it would appear that the discretion provided by the “substantial compliance” legislation in British Columbia has resulted in a more just result than that of Ontario’s “strict compliance” legislation.

Thank you for reading!

James Jacuta

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