Reminders re: Certificates of Pending Litigation

January 14, 2020 Natalia R. Angelini Estate Litigation, Litigation Tags: , 0 Comments

In our estate litigation practice, we commonly seek orders permitting registration of a Certificate of Pending Litigation (CPL) against title to property that is, for instance, an estate asset that a client is seeking to preserve until the litigation is concluded.

In order to obtain a CPL, one needs to demonstrate that an interest in land is in question, and in determining whether to order the issuance of a CPL, the following legal principles ought to be considered, as highlighted in Perruzza v Spatone:

  • the threshold in respect of the “interest in land” is “whether there is a triable issue as to such interest, not whether the plaintiff will likely succeed”;
  • the onus is on the party opposing the order for a CPL to demonstrate that there is no triable issue with respect to whether the party seeking the CPL has “a reasonable claim to the interest in the land claimed”; and
  • the governing test is that the Court must exercise its discretion in equity and look at all relevant matters between the parties in determining whether a CPL ought to be granted.

We can see from the above that the threshold to obtain a CPL is not high; presumably the rationale being that it is more favourable to have a property in dispute secured during litigation than risk it being dissipated to the prejudice of a litigant.

Once a CPL is obtained it is prudent to assess the circumstances throughout the life of the litigation so that it is discharged at the appropriate time. As noted in Perruzza, factors the court can consider to discharge a CPL include whether the land is unique, whether there is an alternative claim for damages, whether there is or is not a willing purchaser and the harm if the CPL is or is not removed.

If the litigation stagnates, without reminders in place it is possible for the registered CPL to be left unaddressed.  These were the circumstances in Novia v. Saccoia Estate (Trustee of). The CPL had remained on title for more than 20 years and even after the defendant’s death, ultimately forcing the defendant’s executor to obtain an order dismissing the action and discharging the CPL.

Thanks for reading and have a great day,

Natalia Angelini

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