Will Drafting and Testamentary Capacity

August 28, 2017 Hull & Hull LLP Capacity, Estate Planning Tags: , , , , , , , , 1 Comment

Many estate solicitors are retained to draft Wills for elderly clients.  Concerns over capacity are normal.  As such, I am frequently asked how thoroughly a drafting solicitor should enquire into capacity.

Although there is no universal answer, the decision in Wiseman v Perrey, provides helpful insight.  Referring to an earlier decision from the Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench, the Court set out the basic rules dealing with testamentary capacity where a professional, such as a drafting solicitor, is involved:

(a) neither the superficial appearance of lucidity nor the ability to answer simple questions in an apparently rational way are sufficient evidence of capacity;

(b) the duty upon a solicitor taking instructions for a will is always a heavy one.  When the client is weak and ill and, particularly when the solicitor knows that he is revoking an existing will, the responsibility will be particularly onerous; and

(c) a solicitor cannot discharge his duty by asking perfunctory questions, getting apparently rational answers and then simply recording in legal form the words expressed by the client.  He must first satisfy himself by a personal inquiry that true testamentary capacity exists, that the instructions are freely given, and that the effect of the will is understood.

There are a variety of tools a solicitor should employ, including having the testator take a Mini-Mental State Examination.

Depending on the severity of the solicitor’s concern, the use of a capacity assessor who specializes in assessing testamentary capacity should be considered.  The assessor should be specifically instructed to assess whether a testator has the capacity to make a new Will.  Although not an easy topic to broach with a client, these types of assessments can assist in ensuring the testator’s last ‘capable’ wishes are followed.

Noah Weisberg

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1 Comment

  1. Charles Wagner 4 years Reply

    Noah I found the blog very informative. I don’t know how well trained the average lawyer is regarding administering a mini mental state examination and wonder how reliable that exam might be. I would be interested in how important you view the lawyer’s obligation to take notes.

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