Revocation by Marriage in Saskatchewan

November 2, 2016 Suzana Popovic-Montag Common Law Spouses, Estate Planning, Wills Tags: , , 0 Comments

A recent decision of the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal paraphrases an interesting provision (s.17) of the Saskatchewan Wills Act: “Once a testator cohabits continuously for two years and then makes a will, the law presumes the testator has turned his or her mind to the question of disentitling one’s spouse and, if the parties subsequently marry, the marriage does not revoke the prior will.”

When marriage does not revoke a prior will
“Once a testator cohabits continuously for two years and then makes a will, the law presumes the testator has turned his or her mind to the question of disentitling one’s spouse and, if the parties subsequently marry, the marriage does not revoke the prior will.”

In Santiago v Trottier 2016 SKCA 113, the daughter of the deceased (Dawn) appealed the lower court’s finding that her father’s will was revoked by his marriage. Roy Trottier died in 2012, survived by his wife, Paulette, and his two children from a previous relationship. In 1998, Roy and Paulette began to cohabit. Around the same time, Roy made a will in which his two children were appointed executors and primary beneficiaries, with some specific bequests to Paulette. Roy and Paulette married in 2012, after Roy was diagnosed with cancer. Roy died shortly thereafter.

Section 17(3) reads as follows: “[revocation by marriage] does not apply where the testator marries a person with whom he or she is cohabiting and has cohabited in a spousal relationship continuously for two years.”

Dawn’s argument was not without merit. Her submission was that, on a plain reading of the statute, Paulette and Roy had married each other after having cohabited in a spousal relationship continuously for many years. As such, Dawn submitted that subsection 17(3) should operate to prevent the 1998 will from being revoked by the marriage.

The Court of Appeal upheld the decision of the lower court, which found that the marriage did in fact revoke the 1998 will. The decision is complicated by the fact that the cohabitation provision was proclaimed in force in 2001, after the 1998 will was made. Both the lower court and the appeal court found that the making of the 1998 will prior to the spousal relationship was a key factor. Essentially, the lower court and appeal court concluded that the presumed intention of common law and married spouses to contemplate their obligations to one another would be defeated if Dawn’s argument prevailed. To quote from the appeal decision: “…the Chambers judge settled upon an interpretation that best conforms to achieving equality between married and common law couples.”

It is important to review a will or estates plan periodically, particularly after major life events, such as marriage, cohabitation, or the birth of a child. We have previously blogged on the effect of marriage on a will and estate planning after a second marriage.

Thank you for reading.

Suzana Popovic-Montag

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
 

CONNECT WITH US

CATEGORIES

ARCHIVES

TWITTER WIDGET