Lessons from the Family Dispute Resolution Conference

November 28, 2016 Ian Hull Mediators Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments
“The second annual Family Dispute Resolution Conference”

We were proud to support the second annual Family Dispute Resolution conference, “FDRevolution,” held by the Family Dispute Resolution Institute of Ontario (FDRIO) last week. The FDRIO mandate includes providing information for the public and legal professionals about family dispute resolution (FDR) processes and options.

The primary focus of the FDRIO is, unsurprisingly, family law. There is a lot, however, that those of us who practice in estates can learn from FDR. We have blogged many times about the importance of family dynamics in resolving estates disputes. Last week’s conference provided a lot of valuable information about managing family relationships and effectively avoiding and resolving family disputes.

Remember culture affects everything

 Baldev Mutta and Amandeep Kaur of Punjabi Community Health Services, Peel Region gave a presentation on cultural competence. They reminded the audience that culture affects decision-making, communication, and social interactions.

Legal practitioners must be aware of how culture affects their own perceptions and a client’s perceptions of a legal issue. It is important for lawyers and mediators to suspend judgement and recognize how a client’s cultural lens is different from the dominant “Canadian” culture. FDR practitioners can better help clients by asking clients to identify and describe their perceptions of the conflict or issue and then determining what values and beliefs led to that perception. Understanding how and why a client is making certain decisions can help lead to a successful resolution.

The importance of Emotional Intelligence

The keynote speaker Karen BK Chan spoke about the importance of emotional intelligence (EI) and provided some practical tools to use in dispute resolution. Chan suggested that EI is twice as important as IQ or technical skills, which she described as “threshold capabilities.” A high EI can help lawyers and mediators manage tense situations. Some practical tips for strengthening EI include: listen to , ask for, and reflect on feelings; promote empathy between parties in order to facilitate dialogue; and to name and normalize strong emotions.

For information about the FDRIO and news and events, see their website.

Thank you for reading.

Ian M. Hull

Other Articles You Might Enjoy

The Importance of Family Dynamics

Does the Collaborative Family Law Model have a Place in Estate Litigation?

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