Is an Update to the Laws of Parentage Coming?

October 6, 2016 Natalia R. Angelini Ethical Issues, General Interest, In the News, Uncategorized Tags: , , 0 Comments

We do not have an automatic recognition of same-sex parents in Ontario, as the rules of parentage in section 1 of the Children’s Law Reform Act (“CLRA”) state that a person is the child of his or her “natural parents”.  The exception to this is where an adoption order has been made, which is what one or both same-sex parents would need to obtain in order to have their parentage recognized.

Father holding his child, changes to the Laws of Parentage
“On September 29, 2016, the All Families Are Equal Act was introduced, and, if passed, is expected to take effect in the New Year.”

On June 22, 2016, by way of a consent Order, the Court declared the CLRA to be in breach of s.1 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms to the extent that “the legislation does not provide equal recognition and benefit and protection of the law to all children, without regard to their parents’ sexual orientation, gender identity, use of assisted reproduction or family composition, and to the extent that the legislation does not provide equal recognition and the equal benefit and protection of the law to all families.”

On September 29, 2016, the All Families Are Equal Act was introduced, and, if passed, is expected to take effect in the New Year.  Among other things, this new legislation will reportedly ensure the following:

  • where a child is conceived through assisted reproduction, the parents are the birth parent and the birth parent’s partner, if any, at the time of the child’s conception (no court order required);
  • the intended parents of a child born to a surrogate would be recognized without a court order if (i) the surrogate and the intended parent(s) received independent legal advice and entered into a written pre-conception surrogacy agreement; and (ii) the surrogate provides written consent to give up her parental status before conception and seven days after the child’s birth; and
  • a court can grant a declaration of parental status to a deceased person in relation to a child conceived after their death (the child can inherit and seek support from the deceased parent’s estate if born within three years of death).

I look forward to seeing how the legislation is interpreted, and whether the uncertainty that has long plagued this area of the law will be eliminated.

Thanks for reading,

Natalia Angelini

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