World Alzheimer’s Month: 5 Common Misconceptions About Dementia

September 23, 2016 Nick Esterbauer Capacity, In the News Tags: , , , , 0 Comments
World Alzheimer's Month
“Research suggests that there are ways to limit the risks of developing dementia, such as an active and social lifestyle and a healthy diet.”

This September marks the fifth annual World Alzheimer’s Month.  World Alzheimer’s Month and World Alzheimer’s Day, which took place on Wednesday, are part of a campaign to increase awareness of dementia and related misconceptions.

In honour of World Alzheimer’s Day, Global News posted an article outlining five common misconceptions about dementia.  They focused on the following:

  • “Misconception: A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia means my life is over.”  Individuals can continue to live and function normally for years despite a diagnosis with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • “Misconception: Dementia is a disease of the elderly.”  Although the likelihood of developing dementia and other memory issues may increase with age, early-onset dementia can affect individuals in their 40s or 50s.  In Canada, approximately 16 thousand of those living with dementia are under the age of 65.
  • “Misconception: There’s nothing I can do to prevent or stave off dementia.”  Research suggests that there are ways to limit the risks of developing dementia, such as an active and social lifestyle and a healthy diet.
  • “Misconception: Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are all about memory loss.”  Dementia goes deeper than memory loss and this misconception may trivialize the disease.
  • “Misconception: One of my parents had Alzheimer’s disease, so I’m going to get it, too.”  The most common forms of dementia do not appear to be genetically inherited, so the risk of developing Alzheimer’s is only loosely connected to family history of the disease.

Approximately 564 thousand Canadians live with Alzheimer’s disease.  It is anticipated that by 2031, this number will increase to approximately 937 thousand.

Have a great weekend.

Nick Esterbauer

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