Durante Minore Aetate – Acting as Executor for a Minor

September 19, 2016 Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Executors and Trustees, General Interest, Guardianship, Trustees, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

When dealing with the administration of an estate, there is the possibility that a bequest will be left to a minor, resulting in the need for it to be held in trust until the minor reaches the age of majority. It is also possible to have a situation where the executor named in a will is a minor at the date of death of the testator, pursuant to section 26 of the Estates Act. This will result in a Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee being issued to the guardian of the named executor, until he or she turns 18. The guardian acting as executor is called durante minore aetate, which translates to “during the minority”.

Pursuant to section 26 of the Estates Act:

Guardian acting as executor
“The guardian acting as executor is called durante minore aetate, which translates to “during the minority”.”

(1) Where a minor is sole executor, administration with the will annexed shall be granted to the guardian of the minor or to such other person as the court thinks fit, until the minor has attained the full age of eighteen years, at which time, and not before, probate of the will may be granted to the minor

(2) The person to whom such administration is granted has the same powers as an administrator has by virtue of an administration granted to an administrator during minority of the next of kin.

The powers of durante minore aetate to act in the place of a minor are not limited. As per Re Cope, (1880), 16 Ch. D. 49 (Eng Ch Div) at 52:

The limit to his administration is no doubt the minority of the person, but there is no other limit. He is an ordinary administrator: he is appointed for the very purpose of getting in the estate, paying the debts, and selling the estate in the usual way; and the property vests in him.

In Monsell v Armstrong, (1872) LR 14 Eq 423 at 426, the court held there is “no distinction between a common administrator durante minore aetate as regards the exercise of a power of sale.” Along with the power of sale, it seems too that an administrator for the use and benefit of a minor may also assent to a legacy and may be sued for the debts of the deceased.

An application for a certificate of appointment for the use and benefit of a minor should be in Form 74.4, 74.4.1, 74.5, or 74.5.1 (forms can be found here) and should include an explanation stating that the executor named in the will is not the applicant due to the minority of the named executor. Once the application is filed, the matter will be referred to a judge. If the judge orders a certificate of appointment of estate trustee with a will, it will include the phrase “Right of (name of minor executor) to be appointed estate trustee on attaining 18 years of age is reserved.”

Thanks for reading,

Ian M. Hull

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