Wills Basics: Revocation, Revival, Republication

May 9, 2016 Ian Hull Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The nature of a will is that it is revocable, meaning that testators can change their mind, cause their will to no longer be in effect, and make a new will at any time. However, just as there are requirements for executing a will, there are specific rules in place that govern how a will may be revoked.

blog photo - revocationIn Ontario, a will can only be revoked in certain ways. Under section 15 of the Succession Law Reform Act, RSO 1990, c S.26 (SLRA), a will or part of a will is revoked only by (a) marriage; (b) another will; (c) a writing declaring an intention to revoke, and made in accordance with the requirements of making a will; or (d) burning, tearing or otherwise destroying the will by the testator with the intention of revoking it. Accordingly, testators cannot simply decide that they no longer wish their will to govern their estate without any further action. They must take the step of executing a later will, destroying the will, or putting it in writing in the correct format that they wish to revoke. Many people are not aware that marriage revokes a will, so clients should always be advised of this in order to prevent any possible inadvertent revocation.

However, revocation of a will may not be the final word. Revival and republication exist to bring a revoked will back into effect. Revival is the restoring of a revoked will. Pursuant to section 19 of the SLRA, a revoked will can only be revived by a will or codicil that shows intention to give effect to the will or part that was revoked, or by re-execution of the revoked will with the required formalities, if any. The intention to revive a revoked will must appear on the face of the instrument purporting to revive it, and simply describing a later codicil as being a codicil to an existing will is not sufficient. If a will has been destroyed, it can only be revived by re-execution of a draft or copy or by a codicil referring to a draft or copy.

As opposed to revival, which restores a revoked will, republication, on the other hand, confirms a valid will. Republication occurs when a testator re-executes a will for the express purpose of republishing it or by making a codicil to the will. Essentially, republishing a will shifts the date of the will, so it is as if the testator had made a new will, with the exact same dispositions, at a later date. Republication must be in the form of a codicil to an existing will, or a document that makes specific reference to the will being republished as an existing testamentary document.

These may seem like simple concepts, but it is important to keep the basic rules in mind, as well as the sources of such rules, in order to properly advise clients and pre-empt easily avoidable issues as much as possible.

Thanks for reading.

Ian Hull

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