The Ontario Retirement Pension Plan – Implementation and How It Works

March 21, 2016 Ian Hull Estate Planning Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

We blogged about the Ontario Retirement Pension Plan (“ORPP”) some time ago when it was first proposed and introduced. The ORPP will begin on January 1, 2017, and will be fully implemented by January 1, 2020. According to the Ontario government website with respect to the ORPP, studies show that people are not able to save enough money for retirement and that the Canada Pension Plan (“CPP”) is insufficient, stating that the maximum yearly benefit from CPP in 2015 is $12,780 and the average yearly benefit is $7,000.

blog photo - ORPPThe ORPP will be mandatory for employees who do not have a comparable workplace pension plan. Ontario has defined this to be a registered pension plan that meets certain minimum thresholds.

Both the ORPP itself and the contribution rates for the ORPP will be phased in from 2017 to 2020, as set out in this article from the National Law Review. For instance, the initial implementation of the ORPP in January 2017 will begin with large employers, at a rate of contribution of 0.8 percent by both the employer and employee (for a total of 1.6 percent). This will then be increased to 1.6 percent each the following year and further increased to 1.9 percent each starting in 2019. Similar phasing will take place as medium-sized employers begin the ORPP in January 2018, small employers in January 2019, and employers with registered plans that do not meet the comparability threshold in January 2020. Ontario’s ORPP website also provides a helpful chart describing the phases that can be viewed here.

Last month, Ontario reached an understanding with the federal government that ORPP premiums will be collected through the existing CPP framework. Ontario also delayed the date to begin collecting premiums from large employers who will be included in the first phase of implementation. Although they will be required to register as of January 2017, they will not be required to remit premiums until January 2018.

Once it has been fully phased-in, the contribution rate will be a combined 3.8 percent of pensionable earnings. For an individual earning $50,000.00 per year, for example, who contributed to ORPP for 40 years and retired at age 65, this results in an ORPP payment of $7,138 per year, in addition to CPP, OAS, and other retirement savings.

It is stated that the ORPP is intended to complement existing retirement savings arrangements, not replace them. For many individuals, there will still be a need to make individual plans with respect to retirement saving and planning. As always, it is important to consider you own individual needs during retirement and consult advisors who can help you make and implement a comprehensive plan.

Thanks for reading.

Ian Hull

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