Protecting the Vulnerable Testator: Health Care Worker Bequests

March 16, 2016 Suzana Popovic-Montag Elder Law, Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

According to the Ontario Human Rights Commission, approximately 60,000 of the 1.5 million older persons living in Ontario experience elder abuse. Of these reported cases, financial abuse is the most prevalent as it is the most common form of elder abuse in Canada.

As practitioners of elder law, we often see perpetrators who, sadly, are family members eager to get control of an aging parent’s finances. However, in other cases, the perpetrator is not a family member at all. Rather, he or she is an employee of a health care institution or a caregiver sent to provide in-home care.

Older persons in poor health are often isolated and vulnerable. This is particularly true with respect to those who live alone and are dependent on assistance from a health care worker, as well as those who reside in long term care facilities. Accordingly, many health care workers may find themselves in a position of power or influence over their charge. As a result, some Canadian provinces have enacted legislation that attempts to avoid the potential abuse of power that may emerge within these types of relationships.

AA87A01CA5

For instance, in British Columbia, the Wills, Estates and Succession Act provides at section 52:

In a proceeding, if a person claims that a will or any provision of it resulted from another person

(a) being in a position where the potential for dependence or domination of the will-maker was present, and (b) using that position to unduly influence the will-maker to make the will or the provision of it that is challenged,

and establishes that the other person was in a position where the potential for dependence or domination of the will-maker was present, the party seeking to defend the will or the provision of it that is challenged or to uphold the gift has the onus of establishing that the person in the position where the potential for dependence or domination of the will-maker was present did not exercise undue influence over the will-maker with respect to the will or the provision of it that is challenged.

Accordingly, in relationships of dependence, an automatic presumption of undue influence is established and the burden of proof is shifted onto the person upholding the will. As undue influence cases are notoriously difficult to prove, this legislation can facilitate the process.

In Quebec, the legislature has gone even further. Art. 761 of the Civil Code of Quebec provides:

A legacy made to the owner, a director or an employee of a health or social services establishment who is neither the spouse nor a close relative of the testator is without effect if it was made while the testator was receiving care or services at the establishment. []

This restriction on testamentary freedom is viewed as a necessity given the need to protect vulnerable people.

In Ontario, there are no similar legislative provisions in the Succession Law Reform Act. However, the Courts have established the principle of suspicious circumstances which creates a presumption of undue influence when certain circumstances are present.

Thank you for reading.

Suzana Popovic-Montag

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
 

CONNECT WITH US

CATEGORIES

ARCHIVES

TWITTER WIDGET