Personal Care Compensation

November 19, 2015 Lisa-Renee Elder Law, Guardianship Tags: , , 0 Comments

In Ontario, the courts have held that personal care compensation must be “reasonable”.  To determine what is “reasonable” the courts must take into consideration the specific circumstances in each case.  Factors to be considered were set out in the hallmark case Re Brown, [1999] O.J. No. 5851, 31 E.T.R. (2d) 164, which include:

  • the nature and extent of the services provided;
  • the need for the service;
  • the qualifications of the person providing the services;
  • the value of such service; and
  • the period over which the services were provided.

In the recent case Childs v Childs, 2015 ONSC 4036, Justice Tranmer was asked to determine whether a child of an incapable woman should be awarded compensation for providing care to her mother.  In doing so, Justice Tranmer considered not only the factors set out in Re Brown but also identified additional factors that should be considered when the court is called upon to make an order for personal care compensation in the context of a parent and child relationship.

Eileen Childs has four adult children: Michael, Andrew, Peter and Caroline.  She raised all of them from birth with her late husband.  As Eileen’s battle with Alzheimer’s dementia and other health challenges got progressively worse, it became clear to her children that she could no longer manage her property and care for her person.  Although Eileen had significant liquid assets available to cover the cost of proper homecare, her children could not agree on the care their mother was to receive.

It was Eileen’s wish to remain living in her own home.  To grant this wish her daughter, Caroline, moved into her mother’s home to provide full-time in-house care and support. Eileen’s sons, Michael and Andrew also provided some care to their mother for a short period of time.

The issue to be addressed by Justice Tranmer was whether Caroline was entitled to be compensated for the in-house care that she provided to her mother.

In granting Caroline a $500 monthly stipend for compensation, Justice Tranmer makes it clear that  “a child should not be paid to care for an ailing mother” but  nonetheless acknowledged the principle that a guardian or attorney for personal care may be reasonably compensated for personal care provided to an incapable person.  In considering the reasonableness in this case, he identified three additional factors that should be considered by the court, namely:

  • the financial circumstances of the incapable person at the time the request for compensation is made;
  • whether the payment of compensation poses a risk to the incapable person’s finances; and
  • any sacrifices made or losses suffered to undertake the care of a parent.

In light of Justice Tranmer’s decision it appears that when a child is making a claim for personal care compensation they must keep in mind that they may not be entitled to receive compensation for the care that they provide if the payment of compensation would have a negative consequence on their parent’s finances.

Thanks for reading!

 

Lisa-Renee Haseley

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