Does the Collaborative Family Law Model have a Place in Estate Litigation?

August 24, 2015 Ian Hull General Interest Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Estate litigation often involves not only financial, but emotional issues. Among the most common disagreements are those between family members, whether amongst siblings, or between siblings and a surviving spouse. In some cases, the parties cannot get along and they may require that the Court determine the matter in dispute. However, there are also situations where the disagreement can be worked out between the two sides, such as through an Alternative Dispute Resolution (“ADR”) process like mediation, without the extra time and expense that comes with a Court proceeding.

Another form of ADR used primarily in the family law context is Collaborative Family Law (“CFL”). CFL is structured in a series of four-way meetings between the parties and their lawyers. There is no mediator, arbitrator, or judge present, so CFL requires a high level of trust between the lawyers and clients. Candidates for this collaborative approach to dispute resolution are often parties who still get along reasonably well, and who are willing to cooperate with one another.

Based on the frequently emotional and familial aspects of estate litigation, it seems that CFL, or a form of CFL, could be applicable in the estates context. Back in 2010, as noted by this prior blog post, there seemed to be some interest in applying the CFL model to estate Law. This article in Canadian Lawyer from later that same year discussed why collaborative estate law didn’t seem to be catching on.

One of the key features of CFL that seems to make it unattractive in estate law is that, if after the series of four-way meetings, the parties cannot agree between themselves, they must start from scratch. The lawyers who participated in CFL cannot continue to represent the same client in court proceedings. All information produced in the CFL process has to be reproduced, including financial statements, expert reports, appraisals, etc.  Although the best case scenario in CFL involves saving money as well as preserving relationships, the worst case scenario could possibly involve additional expenses and harm to relationships in any event.

However, perhaps the clause that restricts a lawyer from staying on the file after unsuccessful meetings could be removed, or at least modified. One possibility considered is to disqualify only the individual lawyer who worked on the file, and not the entire firm. This may make it more accessible to parties who would otherwise be good candidates for resolving their problem in a collaborative way, as opposed to an adversarial one.

Thank you for reading.

Ian Hull

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
 

CONNECT WITH US

CATEGORIES

ARCHIVES

TWITTER WIDGET