UPDATE: Cowderoy v. Sorkos Estate Revisited Revisited

September 18, 2014 Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

On September 7, 2012, we blogged on the trial decision of Cowderoy v. Sorkos EstateAt trial, the court found that the deceased had repeatedly promised his step-grandchildren his farm and two cottage properties.  Applying the doctrine of proprietary estoppel, the trial judge ordered that the promised properties be conveyed to the grandchildren. This had an effect on a separate proceeding, being a claim for dependant’s support by the deceased’s spouse.  There, the trial judge considered the size of the estate, excluding the farm and cottage properties.  He also, without explanation, reduced a bequest to the spouse from $250,000 to $150,000.  The trial judge had also denied a request to have the two proceedings tried together.

The decisions were appealed, and the appeal decision was released on September 3, 2014.

The Court of Appeal received fresh evidence to the effect that the transfer of the properties to the step-grandchildren would leave the estate without sufficient assets to satisfy the spouse’s dependant support claim. 

With respect to the issue of consolidation, the Court of Appeal held that the judge erred in not consolidating the claims. 

With respect to the proprietary estoppel claim of the step-grandchildren, the Court of Appeal upheld the finding of proprietary estoppel. However, the Court of Appeal held that the promise was to bequeath the properties upon the deceased’s death, not to convey the properties. This had an impact on the appropriate remedy.  The properties were to be deemed to have been bequeathed to the step-grandchildren. The upshot of this is that the properties remained in the estate, and may be subject to the dependant support claim of the spouse.

I say that the properties “may be” subject to the dependant support claim because of the impact of s. 71 of the Succession Law Reform Act.  This section provides that where a deceased has entered into a contract to bequeath property, the property is not liable to a dependant support order, “except to the extent that the value of the property exceeds the consideration therefor”.  This would require that the value of the consideration for the properties, being the value of the services provided by the step-grandchildren to the deceased, be determined, along with the values of the properties.  If the values of the properties exceeded the consideration, then this amount would be available to be charged with the dependant support order.

In the end, the Court of Appeal ordered a new trial of the spouse’s dependant support claim, taking into account the value of the properties, and to determine the extent, if any, to which the properties are to be attached to secure any dependant’s relief order.

Thank you for reading.

Paul Trudelle

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
 

CONNECT WITH US

CATEGORIES

ARCHIVES

TWITTER WIDGET