Asthma Inhalers in the Principal’s Office: Rampant Rulitis

December 11, 2013 Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, General Interest, Health / Medical, In the News Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

At present, there is no legal framework in Ontario governing the storage of asthma inhalers within schools. The absence of such a framework shifts the decision-making into the hands of the individual school administrators and/or school boards. What has evolved as a result of this legal vacuum is a patchwork of asthma management plans.  Many of these plans lump asthma inhalers with other medications (incl. antibiotics, medications used to treat symptoms of ADHD, etc.), thus requiring them to be locked in the principal’s office. This inappropriate one-size-fits-all approach to medication storage in schools is a textbook example of ‘rulitis’: ‘a slavish adherence to rules and regulations that goes beyond common sense’ (with credit to André Marin, Ontario Ombudsman, for coining that apt phrase).

Within schools, the placement and storage of rescue inhalers in a secure, centralized location is problematic for a number of well-documented reasons, including: i) Storage of inhalers away from the person precludes the immediate use of the medication at the onset of symptoms. Centralized storage of asthma inhalers flies in the face of the fact that an inhaler delivers a dose of rescue medication, and thus should be considered a life-saving measure, not unlike an epinephrine auto-injector. It is impossible to overstate the differences in outcomes between immediate use of an inhaler and delayed use after symptoms have progressed; and ii) Students are apprehensive about asking for help accessing a centrally-stored inhaler due to embarrassment around being considered ‘medically vulnerable’ and the fear of being deemed disruptive by staff and/or peers. 

Sandra Gibbons and MPP Jeff Yurek (Elgin-Middlesex-London) have been collaborating on a private members’ bill which, if passed, will force every school board in Ontario to implement a comprehensive asthma policy, each of which must also permit a student to carry his or her own asthma medication on their person. On October 9, 2012, Gibbons’ son Ryan died after suffering a severe asthma attack during recess at his school in Straffordville.  Ryan’s attack evolved quickly, his classmates carried him to the principal’s office where his inhaler was kept, but Ryan was already unconscious. Ryan’s school, with tragic consequences, had a zero tolerance policy against inhalers, and had gone so far as to confiscate spare inhalers that he had brought to school just in case he suffered from an attack.  

        

In contrast to Ontario, the U.S. has three prongs of federal legislation in place allowing students to carry inhalers on their person: the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act.  Approximately 6 million American children have asthma, and 200 of them die each year as a result of an asthma attack. The federal legislation is in place as much to save those 200 lives as it is to reduce outpatient visits to doctors and hospital E.R. visits (~4.6 million and 700,000 visits per yr, respectively). Across Canada, over half a million children are affected by asthma and approximately 20 children die each year as the result of an asthma attack. The Lung Association of Ontario estimates that 1 in 5 children have asthma in this province.

This week’s media coverage of Yurek’s proposed private member’s bill (“Ryan’s Law") has raised corollary questions regarding epinephrine auto-injectors (EpiPens) at schools, since they also deliver a rescue medication. Just last month, the U.S. passed the School Access to Emergency Epinephrine Law which encourages schools to carry ‘stock’ epinephrine (i.e. an undesignated supply).  Encouragement is in the form of financial incentives; schools that carry stock supplies will get preference for receiving federal grant monies. While Sabrina’s Law requires all school boards in Ontario to establish an anaphylactic policy, there is currently no provision in the province to allow schools to stock an undesignated supply of auto-injectors.  

Ryan’s Law passed second reading with all-party support at Queen’s Park on December 5, 2013 and will return for third reading some time in the spring of 2014.

Jenn Hartman, Medico-Legal Consultant 

* photo of Ryan Gibbons, from Tillsonburg News

Legal aside: It should be noted that both Sabrina’s Law and Ryan’s Law (as it has been tabled) include ‘Good Samaritan’ language which provides immunity from lawsuits for ‘any act done in good faith’ in response to an anaphylactic reaction or an asthma attack, respectively.

 

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