Renunciation, Resignation, Passing Over And Removal of Estate Trustees

August 15, 2013 Hull & Hull LLP Executors and Trustees, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent decision of the Ontario Court of Appeal, Chambers Estate v. Chambers, 2013 ONCA 511, deals with the concepts of renunciation, resignation, removal and passing over of an estate trustee, and the sometimes subtle distinctions amongst the concepts.

There, a “renunciation” is defined as the “formal act whereby an executor entitled to a grant of probate (or person having the right to a grant of administration) renounces such right.”   Renunciation is not available if a party has been appointed as estate trustee under a Certificate of Appointment, or has already intermeddled with the estate, or, put another way, where a party has dealt with an estate without having been formally recognized as estate trustee. Once an estate trustee has accepted the office, he or she cannot disclaim it by renunciation. In such a case, if the estate trustee no longer wishes to act, he or she must resign.

With respect to removal or passing over, the proper terminology is that an estate trustee is “passed over” before a Certificate of Appointment is issued, or before he or she has acted as estate trustee, and “removed” if a Certificate of Appointment is issued or he or she has intermeddled.

Thank you for reading.

Paul Trudelle

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